Rocks headphones: Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL review

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Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL review

You’ve heard the expression, too many cooks in the kitchen to suggest that things have gone wrong because of too many ideas or too much meddling. Fortunately, the many cooks involved in the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones Engineered by JBL did not meddle too much, except with long-winded names.

JBL is also owned by HARMAN, so it’s more like Under Armour by JBL, owned by HARMAN (a subsidiary of Samsung), and featuring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. It almost sounds like an entertaining dance track with a lot of guests. In any case, approximately four entities put in a lot of work to make your workout more fun and musically motivated, with productivity in mind. How did they all do?

Editor’s note: this Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL review was updated on February 9, 2022, to include information about the microphone poll results and expand the list of buying options.

Who should get the Under Armour Project Rock?

  • Bassheads will enjoy the bass emphasis of both the default frequency response and Dwayne Johnson’s custom EQ.
  • Commuters and travelers can benefit from the long battery life and optional headphone jack with onboard noise cancellation.
  • Audio tinkerers may find that the JBL Headphones app opens up a lot of custom EQ options to play with.
  • Gym goers will want to reap the benefits of an IPX4 rating and TalkThru functions, as well as dedicated button controls.

What’s it like to use the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones?

A nice foamy zip carrying case for the folding headset, with a carabiner for the so inclined, is attached to encourage portability.

Under Armour (UA) and JBL provide a welcome amount of documentation with the Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones, including a wealth of instructions to walk you through its buttons and apps. You get an included 12-month subscription to UA’s MapMyFitness app with the headphones, in addition to the My JBL Headphones app. The headphone jack is an addition to the package that gets you the best possible sound quality, too.

Out of the box and over the ears with Project Rock

Project Rock’s build is a sturdy, almost rubber-feeling plastic affair with hints of an internal metal framework. It’s clear special attention is being paid to ear cushions, which sport a vinyl and foam mesh covering. The Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones holds on tight, but stays fairly comfortable for over an hour when worn with glasses. The vinyl can get hot even without exercise, which is a bit weird for fitness headphones. I wonder why Under Armour and JBL did not use the mesh foam for the entire ear cushion, as we see with the AirPods Max. Vinyl and light padding comprise the headband, which doesn’t provide much stability.

For over-ear headphones, this is pretty compact even with 40mm drivers. The ear cups can turn and arms articulate inwards to fold the Project Rock Over-Ear into the case with ease.

The aesthetic of Project Rock lands somewhere between over-engineered and bonkers like a Tonka truck with its exaggerated proportions. Even the Bluetooth pairing button is an excessive, ribbed slider with an ice blue light. The look’s grown on me over time, as I enjoy the effortless functionality with a hint of fun. You can trigger active noise cancellation (ANC), Ambient Aware, and TalkThru settings by pressing a silhouette of The Rock’s signature bull on the right ear cup. You adjust them in the accompanying app.

The large buttons and sliders make it easy to get direct access to controls. However, they’re all excessively textured and ribbed, which can make it difficult to know which button does what. Oftentimes, I press a button that turns out to be nothing but decoration. In time, you’ll probably get to know the tactile differences. The buttons curve towards the back of the ear cups, which makes ergonomic sense for thumbs and fingers.

How is the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL for working out?

The ear cups can fold flat if you need to put the headset down for a moment. With the TalkThru function, however, you can keep the headphones on while talking to your workout buddy.

In the spirit of good, real-world testing, I broke out my dumbbells and put on the Project Rock headphones. The IPX4 rating promises sweat-proofing. You’ll appreciate having the IP rating on the UA Project Rock alongside the removable, and therefore washable, ear cushions.

Related: What makes a great pair of workout earbuds?

For the most part, the headphones stay put during my workout, except when I lie on my bench to do dumbbell presses, at which point they fall off my head. The only upsides of this are that auto play/pause detection pauses my audio, and that the headset only slips onto the bench, as opposed to flying off while doing something else.

Auto pause/play detection works like a charm when you put the headphones on, or take them off. On the right ear cup, the steady LED indicates Project Rock is paired with a Bluetooth device.

To give Under Armour, Dwayne Johnson, and JBL due credit, Dwayne Johnson probably did test the headset, but we are built completely differently. He’s nearly a foot taller than I, with a larger head for the headphones to grip on to. My workaround is to use my hair to kind of wedge the headband into place when doing any floor work. If you have an average or big noggin, this might not be an issue for you.

Should you download the My JBL Headphones app?

Included My JBL Headphones app lets you select ANC modes, activate The Rock’s EQ, and create and save custom EQs. (Please don’t use the pictured demo EQ as a model for your own EQ, because it’ll sound pretty bad.)

You should absolutely download the My JBL Headphones app (this review used version 5.1.2). While Project Rock has the majority of its features available at the press of a button (particularly if you use voice assistants), important features like firmware updates and custom EQ reside in the app. You can toggle through ANC settings such as Ambient Aware and TalkThru (basically quieting your music so others can speak to you), as well as audio quality settings.

Related: Why do my headphones sound bad?

Possibly the best feature in the My JBL Headphones app is customizable EQ settings, which you can draw in for yourself. This flexibility allows you to diverge from bass-focused frequency responses. Though, it’s very fun and amusing to tap “Activate The Rock,” the associated EQ profile basically masks a lot of the mids and highs. Fortunately, you can rescue it with an alternate EQ, or go ape with it and turn it up if you want even more bass.

This feature alone transforms the Under Armour Project Rock into a fairly flexible and useable headset. Project Rock is capable of blasting your ears with bass when you want, or tuning EQ for listening to podcasts.

What Bluetooth codecs does the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear support?

Like most JBL wireless products your options are AAC and SBC for codecs. Transmitted over SBC latency gets down to 190ms, while over AAC it’s 230ms. This number varies by device quite a bit as we have discussed here. If you want the least latency for videos, use that handy headphone jack.

Related: Best JBL headphones

Bluetooth 5.0 connects to the Under Armour Project Rock when you activate the slider on the right ear cup and hold it for two seconds. An icy blue light indicates through blinking that pairing mode has initiated, Project Rock also does a great job maintaining a steady connection. You could probably leave your phone in the locker room and hit the weights without a hitch—depending on how large the gym is, of course.

How long is the battery life of the Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL?

It’s not impervious to fingerprints or dust, but it’s easy to stash when you’re going to the gym, or plug it in with the headphone cable when the battery dies.

You get an impressive 41 hours and 13 minutes of battery life with the Project Rock. That figure is with ANC activated too, so you can block out the world for nearly two days straight. With a USB-C connection and the cable included in the box, a five-minute speed charge provides you 120 minutes of battery power. That’s enough time to charge it, while you brush your teeth and tie your shoes on the way to the gym or work.

The Bluetooth pairing slider doubles as a power-saving standby switch too, so if you don’t pick up your headphones for a couple of days, it won’t die in the meantime. Not anywhere near an outlet or a computer? Use that headphone jack. Under Armour and JBL cover all your bases here.


Does the Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones have good noise canceling?

Over-ear, closed-back headphones tend to offer good isolation by virtue of covering your whole ear.

For the most part, noise canceling works best at attenuating low-pitched frequencies that repeat with little variation, like airplane din. The Project Rock headset focuses ANC efforts on low and midrange frequencies, complementing the passive isolation’s treble attenuation. You don’t get silence, but JBL has done a good job of quieting the environment across the audio spectrum.

While sub-bass noise is still audible, mids and lows get suitably hampered by ANC. High pitched noises around 8kHz get up to 45dB reduction.

In use, the headphones transform my air conditioner into a sort of quiet midrange whistling noise. Though still audible, it is an improvement. Incidental high-pitched clangs, like that one person at the gym who drops free weights obnoxiously, are usefully reduced by the passive isolation.

How does the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones by JBL sound?

Look, you wouldn’t ask an astronomer to take over as head chef at a Michelin star-rated restaurant. So, why ask Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, known best as an athlete and actor—not a sound engineer—to make a custom EQ for your headphones?

With exaggerated bass and treble and slight under-emphasis in the mids, the default frequency response masks the midrange sounds. Cyan represents the Project Rock performance, and pink represents the SoundGuys Consumer Curve.

We tested the frequency response of two EQs available on the Project Rock, the default EQ and Dwayne Johnson’s Project Rock EQ. Both supply ample bass emphasis, with The Rock’s feeling almost unlistenable with its exaggerated bass. My usual electronic workout music sounds far too bassy, which makes customizing the EQ necessary.

As my colleague Chase Bernath points out, acoustic or indie music that’s less bassy receives a more tolerable bump of lower frequency oomph with The Rock’s Project Rock EQ.

Dwayne Johnson’s custom EQ found in My JBL Headphones app results in a nearly 10dB bump in bass over the SoundGuys ideal, resulting in a lot of auditory masking of other frequencies.

So, does The Rock lift to the Indigo Girls? (I checked.) His Spotify playlist from 2020 is populated mainly by rock and some hip-hop. This urges me to wonder why he and JBL got silly with the bass when he listens to genres that already have a lot of bass in the mix. Upping bass emphasis to already bassy music is like salting already salty fries. Some people apparently prefer it.

Lows, mids, and highs

With the Project Rock EQ picked by Dwayne Johnson, the acoustic and vocal harmony laden song, Closer to Fine by Indigo Girls receives an abundant boost in the bass frequencies. The quietly mixed bass guitar and sparse kick drum sound unusually loud. Vocal harmonies still cut through, but get partly masked by the exaggerated bass. The only reason the vocals remain fairly audible is because the song does not have much of a bass presence to begin with. Meanwhile, the acoustic guitar gets masked by the bass.

The same track on the default EQ suffers from some of the same issues, though to a lesser degree. Bass still masks other frequencies, but reproduction of vocals and acoustic guitar strings sounds fairly accurate. By no means, however, is this frequency response accurate.

Related: Best headphones for bass

Grabbing a track off Dwayne Johnson’s own playlist, Rock & Roll Band by Boston, the default EQ sees bass frequencies slightly masking the snare and cymbals. Falsetto vocals come through well. Switching to Project Rock custom EQ reminds me of standing outside a car blasting the radio with the door closed: the falsetto vocals are very hard to hear above the bass guitar and kick drum masking those mids and highs. The compressed, distorted lead guitar gets lost under the force of the bass frequency’s exaggeration.

If you get the Project Rock headphones and want to adjust the EQ, open the app. Try following our EQ suggestion in order to avoid too much bass, or hearing too little midrange.

Exaggerated frequency responses basically make most people want to turn up the volume because they can’t hear everything adequately. The problem with this stems from auditory masking tricking you into thinking you can’t hear something because the brain chiefly processes whatever sounds loudest. We want you to keep your hearing and resist the urge to increase up the volume. Instead, consider an EQ adjustment. When you can hear every instrument, which the suggested EQ adjustment helps attain, you don’t need to turn it up.


Can you use the Under Armour Project Rock for phone calls?

I have no trouble speaking on the phone with the UA Project Rock headphones with a fan on. The mic response attenuates bass and lower midrange frequencies, so your voice may sound artificially trebly.

Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones microphone demo:

How does the microphone sound to you?

575 votes

As of February 9, 2022, 37.5% of readers deem the mic system as Okay and 33.8% rate it as Bad. In other words, it’ll work in a pinch, but the UA Project Rock isn’t likely to to replace your go to Zoom call headset.

Hold up! Something’s missing:

We’ve made a big improvement to how we demonstrate the microphone performance of products we review. We now use a standardized test setup that plays back pre-recorded phrases from a calibrated artificial mouth in our test chamber, either with or without simulated background noises, simulated reverberant spaces, or artificial wind. This means that samples from every product can be directly compared, which makes it far easier to make meaningful comparisons between products in terms of the raw speech quality or the product’s ability to reject noise.

It will take a while to update our backlog of old test results, but we will update this review (and many others!) once we’re able with improved microphone demos. These will be made obvious in each new sample which begins with the phrase, “This is a SoundGuys standardized microphone demonstration …”

Thank you for bearing with us, and we hope to see you again once we’ve sorted everything out.

Should you buy the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones?

On the left ear cup, is a voice assistant button and USB-C connector. Meanwhile, the right cup has Bluetooth pairing/on/off slider, volume control, and headphone jack connection.

If you want a set of workout headphones with a lot of dedicated buttons, and a solid connection, try the Under Armour Project Rock. It has a little bit of everything: from ANC to TalkThru and a dedicated app. With removable and washable ear cushions, you get a sanitary and reasonably comfortable experience. However, the bass response is a little bonkers (but maybe you like that) and the vinyl gets hot. Those of us with smaller skulls than The Rock might also find the headband a little loose, but upright listeners needn’t worry.

At about $300 USD upon release, you’ll find quite a lot of competition. For less money, you can get good workout headphones. Does the Project Rock do everything you want and pretty well? Conceivably, you can do more than simply exercise with this headset. Its battery life and optional headphone jack with ANC make it a good candidate to accompany you on a long flight, or on your daily commute. If the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear plays the part of two headphones, the price seems reasonable.

Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones

All prices listed in USD unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and vary by region. Unfortunately, we cannot list Amazon prices on the site, as they vary greatly by currency.

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What should you get instead of the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones?

The Bose 700 Headphones use touch controls and have three buttons in total, one of which is for pairing, another is for controlling the level of ANC, and a third that can activate the Google Assistant.

The answer sort of depends on what you want from your headphones. For less than Under Armour’s over-ear headset, the Shure AONIC 40, which supports Android-friendly codecs like aptX, a premium build, but has slightly worse ANC. You can’t really take it to the gym though, so something like the Bose Noise Canceling Headphones 700 might be preferable. It’s similarly spec’d with IPX4, better ANC, and consumer-friendly frequency response. Unlike Project Rock, the Bose headset doesn’t fold down—the ear cups rotate flat, at least.

Frequently asked questions about the Under Armour Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones

A close relative to the Project Rock is another Under Armour/JBL collaboration, the Train Sport Wireless On-Ear Bluetooth Gym Headphones. It goes for around $100 USD less than UA Project Rock. Sporting an on-ear fit, it is less comfortable, but more portable. You also get only 16 hours of playback, falling quite short of the Project Rock’s lifespan, though the sweatproof cushions feel similar. When you look at the alternatives, it’s easy to see how this collaboration between Under Armour, JBL, and Dwayne Johnson really fills a niche.

To pair the Project Rock Over-Ear headphones, follow these steps:

  1. Open your smartphone settings and enable Bluetooth.
  2. Turn your headphones on, and hold the power slider up for three seconds. The headphones will enter pairing mode.
  3. Select the Under Armour headset in your Bluetooth menu.

To connect a new device, press and hold the play/pause button for three seconds.

Project Rock Under Armour x JBL Over-Ear Headphones Test Review

While Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s Project Rock Under Armour apparel and gear collection is probably best-known for the actor’s signature line of training sneakers and workout clothes like stringer tanks and sleeveless hoodies with no-nonsense slogans, the collab has also resulted in a series of excellent Bluetooth headphones. The two iterations of earbuds and rugged pair of on-ear cups, all made in collaboration with audio company JBL, have brought The Rock’s trademark toughness to his fans’ ears.

The audio collection grows with the latest Project Rock drop available today, which includes a brand new set of Bluetooth over-ear training headphones designed for use (and abuse) in the gym and everywhere else. I got a chance to test out the headphones for a week before the launch, putting the set through its paces in just about every situation. The unit performs in every scenario, giving Rock fans and hardcore muscleheads alike a worthy pair of over-ear headphones for their workouts.

UnderArmour UA Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones

UnderArmour UA Project Rock Over-Ear Training Headphones

Now 50% Off

$150 at Under Armour

The sound from the over-ear headphones is more immersive than the previous buds and on-ear unit; the cups fit comfortably over my ears (which is key, since on-ear headphones have bothered me since I pierced my ear in a fit of pandemic-fueled boredom that year). The company says that the audio was tuned by Dwayne Johnson himself to amplify the bass. I can hear the rumble when the beat hits in hip-hop songs like Tyler, the Creator’s ‘CORSO’ and during the chorus of rock staples like Against Me!’s ‘I Was a Teenage Anarchist,’ which serves well to help motivate during the waning reps of a heavy set.

Like other UA Project Rock x JBL audio devices, there’s a novel “Ambient Aware” setting, controlled by pressing the Brahma Bull logo on the right cup, which makes it easier for the wearer to hear the world around them (ostensibly to talk to a lifting partner in the weight room). I found it most useful when I was walking my dog on a busy city parkway and listening to an audiobook. To pause the playback quickly, just lift the right cup off the ear. There’s also a noise-cancelling setting which works effectively, particularly when I took it on a train. For extra control, there’s a connected app to customize EQ settings and built in Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa connectivity for hands-free direction.

The biggest hook for the headphones is the sweat resistance, a bigger concern with over-ear rigs than earbuds or even on-ear cans since the cup completely covers part of the wearer’s head. The headphones boast an an IPX4 rating and use some of Under Armour’s fabrics for better breathability than other typical audio device materials, and the ear cushions are removable and washable if they get too drenched. Thankfully, even when I started dripping during my third set of non-stop walking lunges during a workout, I didn’t have any issues with my sweat pooling or, even worse, degraded audio quality. They weren’t in the way for overhead presses or pullups, either. The headphones stayed in place and weren’t too uncomfortable during a quick jog, but I don’t think I’d exactly recommend them for longer runs.

Men’s Health

The unit really shows its strength when it comes to battery life. The rechargeable battery uses USB-C quick charging, and the company claims you reap two hours of playback time with just five minutes on the plug. Overall, the headphones are rated for 45 hours of playtime per full charge. I wasn’t able to fully estimate if that’s accurate—I’ve been using the headphones consistently every day for over a week and haven’t yet needed to charge back up. Another key feature: the unit comes with an old school headphone jack. I loved switching between my laptop and phone by plugging and unplugging the chord, depending on what I was doing and what I wanted to listen from moment to moment.

At $299, the Project Rock Over-Ear headphones aren’t cheap—but other Bluetooth over-ear sets from premium makers like Bose and Beats by Dre run just as much or more, and those aren’t designed to take a beating in the weight room. If you’re not interested in another pair of dainty buds you’ll misplace in your gym back, this is the personal audio option for you.

Brett Williams, NASM

Brett Williams, a fitness editor at Men’s Health, is a NASM-CPT certified trainer and former pro football player and tech reporter who splits his workout time between strength and conditioning training, martial arts, and running. You can find his work elsewhere at Mashable, Thrillist, and other outlets.

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Through our research since 2015, we have created a sophisticated, multi-stage technology that delivers highly accurate headphone measurements. The results are as close as possible to what a person hears in reality.

Realphones headphone frequency response lets you hear a linear sound with minimal unwanted coloration.

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Realphones emulates a real professional large control room designed by American architect Tom Headley and rebuilt by British acoustic engineer Roger D’Arcy.

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Nightclubs are equipped with powerful subwoofers. They can reveal low frequency issues that you may not have known about when you were working on the track in the studio.

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The best headphones and speakers of 2020. Choice of RBC Style

The main trends of this year in terms of sound reproduction look like this. Small headphones are getting even smaller, and models with wires are quickly turning into dinosaurs, capturing their owners in this category. They are crowded out by true wireless, where cords are replaced by Bluetooth and usually have active noise cancellation, a skill inherited from older models. However, large overhead “ears” will not disappear anywhere for a long time – simply because they physically fit more powerful speakers into their case and neutralize external noise also with cocoon ear cushions. The range of party speakers is also expanding – manufacturers have increased in this niche, offering to rock parties in large and preferably open spaces.

Over-ear headphones

Marshall Monitor II A.N.C.

Advertising on RBC www.adv.rbc.ru

The British company Marshall, known for its amplifiers, has recently launched the second generation of “Monitors”. From the name it is immediately clear that the emphasis here is on active noise cancellation, which cuts off external noise with oncoming sound waves. With ANC turned on, the “ears” will last 30 hours, and without it – all 45. Externally and functionally, the headphones are made in the Marshall corporate style, there are two buttons on the cups: one is responsible for changing the ANC mode and calling the voice assistant, the second serves as an analog joystick that allows control the device’s player.

© marshallheadphones.com

Harman Kardon FLY ANC

Wireless audio model that also features active noise canceling technology and the ability to connect up to two devices simultaneously. The autonomy of headphones with ANC enabled is 20 hours, without it – 30. The body is made of aluminum, and the ear cushions and ear cups are trimmed with leather – the design promises to be ergonomic in long-term use. Of the features, it is worth highlighting the integrated Google Assistant voice assistant for controlling an Android smartphone, and the headphones also have a wider frequency range from 16 Hz to 22 kHz than usual for such equipment.

© doctorhead.ru

Sony WH-1000XM4

This is a new version of one of the best on-ear full-size active noise canceling headphones. The design has not changed much, outwardly they are similar to WH-1000XM3. The noise here is dampened by the QN1 processor and two microphones. Emphasis is placed on integrating the capabilities of the headphones into the daily activities of the owner – as conceived by the engineers, they can be left on the head almost from morning to night. So, the Speak-to-Chat function automatically detects that you have started talking, and temporarily pauses music playback, and then continues it. The Quick Attention function, in turn, reduces the volume when you touch the right ear cushion. As for sound sources, the Sony WH-1000XM4 can also work with two at the same time, and the battery will last for 30 hours of playback. And yes, fast charging is also here.

© doctorhead.ru

Earplugs

HONOR Magic Earbuds

When it is impossible to take full-size headphones with you, the kids save, those same true wireless. HONOR Magic Earbuds, despite the relatively small size, has active noise canceling technology, and thanks to the charging case, the headphones will work up to 13 hours, depending on the mode of use. Among the codecs, support for SBC and AAC stands out – this will be quite enough for adequate wireless sound quality for most tracks. The device is controlled through sensors, it is possible to configure some gestures through the Huawei AI life application.

© doctorhead.ru

Bang & Olufsen Beoplay E8 Sport

In the post-quarantine era, the demand for outdoor exercise will obviously increase, so the release of sports headphones from the Danish brand turned out to be very timely. Beoplay E8 Sport is, on the one hand, the corporate identity of the company, compactness, moisture and dust protection according to the IP57 standard (immersion in water up to 1 m for 30 minutes), ergonomics, which is especially important when running and long exercises, and autonomy up to 30 hours when using the charging case. The headphones themselves hold a charge of up to seven hours, which is more than enough to listen to music in fits and starts. On the other hand, this is sound transmission via aptX and AAC codecs – without signal compression and quality loss – and support for the latest Bluetooth 5.1 standard for a stable wireless connection with an audio source.

© bang-olufsen.com

Powerbeats Pro

Apple-owned Beats earpieces complement the rugged airPods line with a sporty edge. Here is the same “Apple magic” when connecting to a smartphone, support for the Siri voice assistant, secure fit on the ear, and protection from sweat and moisture. On a single charge, the headphones will work up to nine hours, and the case will give a total of 24 hours of music.

© doctorhead.ru

Sennheiser Momentum True Wireless 2

The company turned 75 this year, and this is an occasion to look at what the brand has come up with for another anniversary. The latest novelty Momentum True Wireless 2 with active noise reduction has support for AAC and aptX codecs, and you can listen to music in several modes: with the mentioned noise reduction or with the Transparent Hearing function (“transparent hearing”) – the latter makes the surrounding sounds loud enough to they could react if necessary. For example, when you are at the airport and it is important not to miss an alert or you are walking down the street. A single charge of the earphones will last for seven hours of listening, and the charging case will add another three full cycles.

© doctorhead.ru

1More TWS ANC In-ear

A new player in the audio equipment market is able to caress the ear not only with the technical component of its devices, but also with the consonance of the brand with the Van Moo band, popular in the early 90s. However, those who did not find those times will be much more told by the name of the Xiaomi concern, under whose wing the 1More brand operates today. Over the past couple of years, he has already managed to gain fame in China, and this year he entered the Russian market. The 1More TWS ANC In-ear model supports three active noise cancellation modes and the aptX codec. There is a dedicated DAC and fast charging – the latter gives two hours of playback after 15 minutes at the outlet; wireless charging is also present.

© usa.1more.com

LG Tone Free FN6

One of the very unusual “ear” solutions was recently shown by LG. The novelty is a standard wireless in-ear headphones with IPX4 moisture protection (from splashes, rain, etc.) and sound quality enhancement technology from the Meridian Audio brand. But a surprise awaits in the charging case: not only does it support wireless and fast charging technologies – the device will last a total of about 18 hours, it also contains an ultraviolet emitter that disinfects the headphones while charging.

© lg.com

Portable systems

Judging by how quickly everyone got bored with Zoom parties, traditional get-togethers will return very quickly. And here portable sound equipment shows itself in all its glory – however, sometimes it’s not so portable, but it will definitely fit in a car. That’s what today you can scare the nightingales and bears.

JBL Boombox 2

Two 4″ woofers and two 20mm tweeters provide sound reproduction and direction in space, which should provide not only loud sound, but also deep bass. Compared to the first boombox, the power has increased from 60W to 80W when using the mains, and from 40W to 60W when using the battery. In addition, it is possible to connect an unlimited number of synchronized JBL devices with PartyBoost technology, which is useful if the party takes up a large space. The main advantages highlighted by the manufacturer: decent autonomy – up to 24 hours and moisture protection according to the IPX7 standard, which allows safe immersion in fresh water to a depth of 1 m for a short time. Experiments are not recommended, but you can not be afraid of the location of the device next to the pool.

© doctorhead.ru

Sonos Move

The Sonos brand is a California-based designer and manufacturer of wireless home audio systems, including smart speakers. Sonos Move is the company’s first portable speaker that lets you stream music at home over Wi-Fi, or via Bluetooth anywhere else when Wi-Fi isn’t available. The manufacturer focused on the ecosystem and smart adaptation of sound to a room or landscape. It is based on a proprietary application through which control takes place. It also supports over 100 global audio streaming platforms, including Apple Music, Spotify, Mixcloud, and Soundcloud. There is support for both AirPlay 2 and Spotify Connect. A single battery charge will give the Move up to 11 hours of use without recharging. At the same time, the standby mode turns on automatically when the speaker is not in use, thereby maintaining a charge reserve of up to five days. Protection against water and dust of the IP56 standard is also present – in case the device is used outdoors.

© press service

Samsung Sound Tower

Samsung’s stationary solution – two types of “sound tower” (MX-T50 and MX-T70) – is quite suitable for private open-airs. Unlike portable systems, these are already serious 500W and 1500W devices for holding a real music show in a large company. The new products have a bidirectional speaker system that emits a signal from two faces of the speaker housing – the latter is made in the form of an almost triangular prism. This solution allowed the rational distribution of sound. And in the older model MX-T70, in addition, there is a 10-inch subwoofer for even more powerful low-frequency radiation – while both models also have their software amplification, the Bass Booster function. Among other characteristics, the ability to connect microphones through a special input (one in the T50 and up to two in the T70) stands out – welcome to the karaoke party. The second feature is LED backlighting with preset effects that react to music.

Raport / rapport

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