Test input lag: Our Monitor Input Tests: Input Lag

Our TV Input Tests: Input Lag

When It Matters

Input lag matters the most for playing video games, either on a console or on a PC. With fast-paced games like fighting or FPS games, quick reflexes are key. Lower input lag can mean the difference between a well-timed reaction for a win or a late response that results in a loss. It doesn’t matter for watching movies, though, so unless you’re a gamer, you have nothing to worry about. You might notice some delay when scrolling through your smart TV’s menu, but it’s rarely an issue for most people. 

Why there’s input lag on TVs

The total input lag time is the addition of three parts

Before we get into the details of how we test, let’s first talk about the causes of input lag. Three main factors contribute to the input lag on the TV: acquiring the source image, processing the image, and displaying it.

Acquisition of the Image

The more time it takes for the TV to receive the source image, the more input lag there will be. With modern digital TVs, using an HDMI cable will allow you to minimize the acquisition time, as that will transfer from the source to the TV almost instantly. This phase of the input lag is rarely an issue on modern TVs as it was more of an issue in the past with analog connections like from early gaming consoles.

Video Processing

Once the image is in a format understandable by the video processor, it will apply at least some processing to alter the image in some way. A few examples:

  • Adjusting the colors and brightness
  • Interpolating the picture to match the TV’s refresh rate
  • Scaling it (like 720p to 1080p, or 1080p to 4k)
  • Adding variable refresh rate technology

The time this step takes is affected by the speed of the video processor and the amount of processing needed. Though you can’t control the speed of the processor, you can exercise some control over how many operations it needs to do by enabling and disabling settings. Only more demanding video processing settings, like motion interpolation, will usually add input lag, while others, like the brightness, won’t.

Displaying the Image

Once the television has processed the image, it’s ready to be displayed on the screen, and the processor sends the video to the screen. However, the screen can’t make it appear instantly, and the amount of time it takes to appear depends on the technology and the panel. Unfortunately, there’s no way to improve or control the amount of time needed in this part, as it changes from TV to TV. However, this is different from the response time, which is the amount of time it takes for the pixels to change colors, and effects motion.

Our Tests

Now, let’s talk about how we measure the input lag. It’s a rather simple test because everything is done by our dedicated photodiode tool and special software. We use this same tool for our response time tests, but it measures something differently with those. For the input lag, we place the photodiode tool at the center of the screen because that’s where it records the data in the middle of the refresh rate cycle, so it skews the results to the beginning or end of the cycle. We connect our test PC to the tool and the TV. The tool flashes a white square on the screen and records the amount of time it takes until the screen starts to change the white square; this is an input lag measurement. It stops the measurement the moment the pixels start to change color, so we don’t account for the response time during our testing. It records multiple data points, and our software records an average of all the measurements, not considering any outliers.

When a TV displays a new image, it progressively displays it on the screen from top to bottom, so the image first appears at the top. As we have the photodiode tool placed in the middle, it records the image when it’s halfway through its refresh rate cycle. On a 120Hz TV, it displays 120 images every second, so every image takes 8. 33 ms to be displayed on the screen. Since we have the tool in the middle of the screen, we’re measuring it halfway through the cycle, so it takes 4.17 ms to get there; this is the minimum input lag we can measure on a 120Hz TV. If we measure an input lag of 5.17 ms, then in reality it’s only taking an extra millisecond of lag to appear of the screen. For a 60Hz TV, the minimum is 8.33 ms. 

We always measure the input lag in the TV’s Game Mode unless our test indicates that we’re supposed to use different settings.

Difference With Response Time Testing

Some people may confuse our response time and our input lag tests. For input lag, we measure the time it takes from when the photodiode tool sends the signal to when it appears on-screen. We use flashing white squares, and the tool stops the measurement the moment the screen changes color so that it doesn’t include the response time measurement. As for the response time test, we use grayscale slides, and this test is to measure the time it takes to make a full transition from one gray shade to the next. In simple words, the input lag test stops when the color on the screen changes, and the response time starts when the colors change.

1080p @ 60Hz Input lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

This test measures the input lag of 1080p signals with a 60Hz refresh rate. This is especially important for older console games (like the PS4 or Xbox One) or PC gamers who play with a lower resolution at 60Hz. As with other tests, this is done in Game Mode, and unless otherwise stated, our tests are done in SDR.

1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution, except for game mode off.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use, while retaining access to all features of the TV.

Good value:
< 40 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

We repeat the same process but with Game Mode disabled. This is to show the difference between in and out of Game Mode. It could be important if you scroll a lot through your TV’s smart OS and you easily notice delay, so if you find it’s too high and it’s bothering you, simply switch into Game Mode when you need to scroll through menus.

This result can also be important if you want to play video games with the TV’s full image processing. You might consider this if you’re playing a non-reaction-based game.

1440p @ 60Hz Input Lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

This result is important if you play 1440p games, like from an Xbox or a PC. However, 1440p games are still considered niche, and not all TVs support this resolution, so we can’t measure the 1440p input lag of those.

4k @ 60Hz Input Lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

The 4k @ 60Hz input lag is probably the most important result for most console gamers. Along with 1080p @ 60Hz input lag, it carries the most weight in the final scoring since most gamers are playing at this resolution. We expect this input lag to be lower than the 4k @ 60Hz with HDR, chroma 4:4:4, or motion interpolation results because it requires the least amount of image processing.

4k @ 60Hz + HDR Input Lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution using a 10-bit HDR signal.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use in HDR.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

With the PC sending a 4k @ 60Hz signal, we use an HDFury Linker to add an HDR signal. This is important if you play HDR games, and while it may add some extra lag, it’s still low for most TVs.

4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 Input Lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution with proper full 4:4:4 chroma, without subsampling.

When it matters:
For PC use and gaming where fine text display (ClearType) is needed.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

This test is important for people wanting to use the TV as a PC monitor. Chroma 4:4:4 is a video signal format that doesn’t use any image compression, which is necessary if you want proper text clarity. We want to know how much delay is added, but for nearly all of our TVs, it doesn’t add any delay at all compared to the 4k @ 60Hz input lag.

4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution, except for game mode off.

When it matters:
For gaming and PC use, while retaining access to all features of the TV.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Like with 1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode, we measure the input lag outside of Game Mode in 4k. Since most TVs have a native 4k resolution, this number is more important than the 1080p lag while you’re scrolling through the menus.

4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution with motion interpolation turned on.

When it matters:
When you want to play video games with motion interpolation (Soap Opera Effect) enabled.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Motion interpolation is an image processing technique that increases the frame rate to a higher one, like if you want to increase a 30 fps video up to 60 fps. However, for most TVs, you need to disable the Game Mode to enable the motion interpolation setting, as only Samsung offers motion interpolation in Game Mode. As such, most TVs will have a high input lag with motion interpolation. Also, we measure this with the motion interpolation settings at their highest because we want to see how the input lag will increase at the strongest, like a worst-case scenario.

8k @ 60Hz Input Lag

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
PC use.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

This test is only important if you have an 8k TV, and your graphics card can output 8k content at 60 fps.

1080p @ 120Hz

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For console and PC gaming.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

We repeat most of the same tests but with 120 fps signals instead. This is especially important for gaming on some gaming consoles, like the Xbox Series X or Xbox One X, as some other devices don’t output signals at 120 fps. The 120Hz input lag should be around half the 60Hz input lag, but it’s not going to be exactly half.

1440p @ 120Hz

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For console gaming and PC gaming.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Once again, this result is only important for PC and Xbox gamers because they use 1440p signals. Not all TVs support this resolution either, so we can’t always test for it.

4k @ 120Hz

What it is:
The average input lag when all the TV settings are optimized to reduce it at this specific resolution.

When it matters:
For console gaming and PC gaming.

Good value:
< 25 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

This test is important if you’re a gamer with an HDMI 2. 1 graphics card or console. Since most 4k @ 120Hz signals require HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, you don’t have to worry about this if your TV or gaming console is limited to HDMI 2.0. For this test, we use our HDMI 2.1 PC with an NVIDIA RTX 3070 graphics card because we need an HDMI 2.1 source to test it.

1080p with Variable Refresh Rate

What it is:
Lowest input lag possible for a 1080p input signal when using Variable Refresh Rate (FreeSync, etc).

When it matters:
When gaming with a device that supports Variable Refresh Rate, such as the Xbox One X or a PC.

Good value:
< 40 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

We also measure the input lag with any variable refresh rate (VRR) support enabled, if the TV has it. VRR is a feature gamers use to match the TV’s refresh rate with the frame rate of the game, even if the frame rate drops. Enabling VRR could potentially add lag, so that’s why we measure it, but most TVs don’t have any issue with this. We measure this test by setting the TV to its maximum refresh rate and enabling one of its VRR formats, like FreeSync or G-SYNC.

1440p with VRR

What it is:
Lowest input lag possible for a 1440p input signal when using Variable Refresh Rate (FreeSync, etc).

When it matters:
When gaming with a device that supports Variable Refresh Rate, such as the Xbox One X or a PC.

Good value:
< 40 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

We repeat the VRR testing with 1440p signals. If the TV doesn’t support 1440p, we skip this test.

4k with VRR

What it is:
Lowest input lag possible for a 4k input signal when using Variable Refresh Rate (FreeSync, etc).

When it matters:
When gaming with a device that supports Variable Refresh Rate, such as the Xbox One X or a PC.

Good value:
< 40 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

Score distribution

Like with 1440p and 1080p, we measure the 4k input lag with VRR enabled. Once again, this is important for gamers.

8k with VRR

What it is:
Lowest input lag possible for an 8k input signal when using Variable Refresh Rate (FreeSync, etc).

When it matters:
When using a PC that supports Variable Refresh Rate.

Good value:
< 40 ms

Noticeable difference:
15 ms

On 8k TVs, we measure the input lag with an 8k signal and VRR enabled.

Additional Information

How input lag is measured

An input lag of 40ms can be seen on the television.

Input lag is not an official spec advertised by most TV companies because it depends on two varying factors: the type of source and the settings of the television. The easiest way you can measure it is by connecting a computer to the TV and displaying the same timer on both screens. Then, if you take a picture of both screens, the time difference will be your input lag. This is, however, an approximation, because your computer does not necessarily output both signals at the same time. In this example image, an input lag of 40 ms (1:06:260 – 1:06:220) is indicated. However, our tests are a lot more accurate than that because of our tool.

    When do we start to notice a delay?

    Most people will only notice delays when the TV is out of Game Mode, but some gamers might be more sensitive to input lag even in Game Mode. Keep in mind that the input lag of the TV isn’t the absolute lag of your entire setup; there’s still your PC/console and your keyboard/controller. Every device adds a bit of delay, and the TV is just one piece in a line of electronics that we use while gaming. If you want to know how much lag you’re sensitive to, check out this input lag simulator. You can simulate what it’s like to add a certain amount of lag, but keep in mind this tool is relative to your current setup’s lag, so even if you set it to 0 ms, there’s still the default delay.

      Other Notes and Related Settings

      • The most important setting to ensure you get the lowest input lag possible is the Game Mode setting. This varies between brands; some have Game Mode as its own setting that you can enable within any picture mode, while others have a Game picture mode. Go through the settings on your TV to see which it is. You’ll know you have the right setting when the screen goes black for a second because that’s the TV putting itself into Game Mode.
      • On some TVs, if you’re using it as a PC monitor, you have to go into PC Mode to get low input lag. 
      • Many TVs have an Auto Low Latency Mode feature that automatically switches the TV into Game Mode when you launch a game from a compatible device. Often, you need to enable a certain setting for it to work. 
      • Some peripherals like Bluetooth mice or keyboards add lag because Bluetooth connections have inherent lag, but those are rarely used with TVs anyways.

      Conclusion

      Input lag is the time it takes a TV to display an image on the screen from when it first receives the signals. It’s important to have low input lag for gaming, and while high input lag may be noticeable if you’re scrolling through Netflix or other apps, it’s not as important for that use. We test for input lag using a special tool, and we measure the input lag at different resolutions, refresh rates, and with different settings enabled to see how changing the signal type can affect the input lag.

      How To Test Input Lag On Your PC

      Testing input lag is a challenging and inexact process. Even RTings, a trusted source of input lag tests, says they had to develop their own tool to make it work, and only some people have the appropriate hardware to do so. However, there is still a way you can test your input lag if you have access to a CRT monitor or a screen with an input lag you already know. 

      Table of Contents

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      What is Input Lag?

      Input lag is the time it takes between when your computer receives a signal, sends it to your monitor, and the action appears on the screen. Most of the time, it isn’t very noticeable. For example, when you’re watching streaming video, it sends one frame after the other, and any lag is accounted for because each frame has the same rate, and you aren’t inputting any signals from your mouse and keyboard.

      One example of lag that’s easy to see is when you’re typing a sentence. It may take a split second between when you press the key and when the letter appears on the document. It’s almost imperceptible because of how low the input lag is on most modern systems. People used CRT displays with basically no input lag in the past, so it wasn’t an issue then.

      There are times when input lag matters a lot, though. For example, competitive gamers can suffer if the input lag between a computer and the display is too high.

      Why Do I Need to Know the Input Lag?

      You need to know the input lag, so you know precisely how much delay it is introducing to your fast-paced computing actions. For example, a display with an input lag of 4ms will be quite a bit better for an FPS gamer than a display with an input lag of 32ms. That’s why you’ll see a lot of gaming monitors advertising their low input lag, with some of them going down to 1ms.

      If you haven’t experienced different input lags, try typing on this Lag Simulator at 0ms and then at 400ms. You’ll see a noticeable difference. 

      Is It Always Better to Buy a Display with a Low Input Lag?

      Sometimes the input lag doesn’t matter much. If you’re not doing fast-paced gaming, you may prefer a display with different specifications and a little more lag. Displays with low input lag often aren’t quite as visually appealing as displays with high input lag numbers because of the types of panels they use to get the low ms rating. This is also why televisions usually have a higher input lag than PC monitors. 

      However, as monitor technology improves, displays with low input lag look better and better. There’s a lot less to compromise on now than there was even five years ago. 

      Is Input Lag Only Affected by Monitors?

      The lag you experience is affected by a few different factors.

      • Your input devices can introduce lag, especially wireless or Bluetooth devices. For example, I use a wireless keyboard and a wired mouse. If I wanted to give myself a competitive advantage, I’d switch to a wired keyboard. It would introduce less lag than my wireless one.
      • Your in-game settings or programs can also introduce lag. If your video processing devices have to add custom overlays or change a GUI element, that can add a bit of extra time. The more your computer has to do to a new image, the longer it will take to appear on the screen.
      • Finally, the input lag of the monitor comes into play. Your screen doesn’t just change the very moment it receives the signal. It takes time to display what input it received. The input lag rating of the monitor refers to this part of the process.

      How to Test Input Lag?

      The best way to find out the input lag of a monitor is to check with the manufacturer or look up independent ratings. Since it’s hard to control for all the factors on an at-home test, they’re not very accurate and won’t give you a rating that’s completely right. 

      However, you can still check to get an idea of how bad your input lag is in a few ways. 

      Camera Test

      To test the lag of your display on your own, you need a monitor that you know the input lag rating of and a camera in addition to the monitor you want to test. However, this won’t be as accurate as the information you’d get from the manufacturer. 

      1. Hook up both monitors to the same computer. Using the same type of connection, like HDMI, would be better than the alternative. 
      2. Set up a camera facing both monitors.
      3. Start a timer app that includes milliseconds on each screen.
      4. Start both apps at the exact same time.
      5. Take a picture of the screens a few times. Calculate the difference between the timer on the control monitor and the timer on the one you’re testing. This difference should give you an idea of the input lag of the monitor you’re trying. 

      One of the primary reasons this doesn’t give a perfectly accurate input lag rating is that you can’t control how quickly the monitor sends signals to the monitors with different cables and connection types. If it prioritizes sending it to the display you’re testing, it may appear to have a lower input lag than it does compared to the control display.  

      How to Reduce Input Lag?

      You can do many things to improve your input lag numbers, even without switching your monitor. 

      • Swap your peripheral devices to wired models if low input lag is your priority. It’s a slight difference, but it can impact you doing something like playing a competitive shooter.
      • Check to see what modes your monitor offers. If you have a Sports Moder or a Game Mode – or anything designed to help with fast-paced activities – it can help reduce the input lag at the cost of picture quality. You can always swap back and forth between settings depending on what you’re doing if you want to have better quality when doing less lag-sensitive activities. 
      • Get rid of anything that includes filters or extra image processing through your monitor or in-game. It can help reduce your lag.
      • Disable custom crosshairs and other GUI elements that aren’t completely necessary. 

      You can monitor your performance with these changes to see how each affects your lag. Changing things as you go can help create the perfect setup for your needs.

      How Much Input Lag is Too Much?

      The amount of input lag you can deal with depends on your computing activities and personal tolerance. Some people don’t mind a bit of delay when doing everyday activities like typing emails or navigating the internet. Some people prefer an instant response, even during those common activities.

      For gamers who rely on fast-paced actions, like competitive shooters or MMO end-gamers, a total input lag under 40 ms can be helpful. If you check out what displays professional players use, they’re generally ones that introduce less than 10 ms to the lag.

      Other users can tolerate a slightly higher delay. For example, if you’re playing something like Stardew Valley or Cookie Clicker, a delay under 80 ms isn’t that bad. Most displays should work for these purposes. However, if you notice a delay between your input and what you see on the screen, it might be time to look into options with lower input lag.  

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Does HDMI Cable Affect Input Lag?

      Your HDMI cable will introduce some input lag because it takes microseconds to send the signal from the computer to your display. However, the delay is so slight that you won’t even notice it.

      Can CPU Cause Input Lag?

      Most of your computer components will introduce a bit of lag as they do the processing and work necessary to make your computer run. If one of your components creates a bottleneck in your system, that could delay processing and introduce even more lag as well.

      Why Am I Lagging with Fast Internet?

      You will still have some input lag, no matter how fast your internet is. However, some lag is also introduced if you’re connecting to another server because of how that server performs and how good your connection to it is. If an external server is slow, you won’t be able to have things work at your optimum speed because that server isn’t providing enough speed for a smooth experience.  

      Do TVs Have More Lag Than Monitors?

      Most televisions have higher input lag than most monitors. While it isn’t true across the board, it is true as a general rule. You should always check with the manufacturer and read what kind of lag the display has before buying it, though.

      You may be surprised at how bad specific displays can be – like I was when I tried to play a first-person shooter on the first 75-inch TV I ever hooked to my computer. The lag was terrible enough to make it unplayable. 

      How to fix lag or lag when typing in Windows

      If characters appear on the screen a few seconds after you press them on the keyboard, this can slow down your work and reduce your productivity. Many factors cause typing to feel out of sync on Windows devices. A slow computer, faulty USB ports, outdated keyboard drivers, and incorrectly configured keyboard settings are just some of the causes of keyboard lag.

      Let’s look at ten troubleshooting steps that can fix keyboard lag while typing.

      Close unused applications

      Your keyboard response time may start to lag when your computer is running slowly. More precisely, when there is not enough basic system resources (CPU and / or RAM). Close unused applications and see if this improves your keyboard input speed.

      Programs for Windows, mobile applications, games – EVERYTHING is FREE, in our closed telegram channel – Subscribe 🙂

      You can also refer to this guide to speeding up Windows to find out why your computer is slow and how to fix performance problems.

      Keyboard connection troubleshooting

      If you are using a wired external keyboard, make sure the cable is firmly connected to your PC’s USB port. Unplug the keyboard and plug it back into the port, or switch the keyboard to a different USB port. You can also use the keyboard on another computer. If the typing lag persists, the keyboard is probably defective.

      Other USB accessories may also interfere with the keyboard connection and cause delays. Disconnect other USB devices connected to your computer and see if that fixes lags in your typing speed.

      For wireless keyboards, make sure the USB receiver/dongle is properly connected to the computer. If you connected it to a USB hub, connect it directly to your computer. Also, make sure the keyboard battery is not dead. Otherwise, connect the keyboard to a power source or replace the batteries.

      Also make sure the keyboard is near the dongle/receiver or computer. This also applies to Bluetooth powered keyboards. Using a wireless keyboard within a few yards of your computer may result in input lag.

      Disable filter keys

      Do you frequently press a key multiple times before your computer receives input? Is your computer not registering keystrokes when you briefly press a key? You may have accidentally activated “Filter Keys”; holding the right shift key for 8 seconds enables this feature. Filter keys prevent unwanted keystrokes by slowing down keyboard input.

      Microsoft designed the filter key functionality to make typing easier for users with neurological impairments such as tremors or hand stiffness. If the filter keys are active on your computer, turn it off and see if that normalizes the keyboard’s responsiveness.

      1. Open the Windows Settings menu and select Ease of Access.
      1. Scroll the sidebar and select Keyboard.

      In the keyboard settings menu, turn off the “Filter Keys” option and uncheck “Allow the use of keyboard shortcuts to launch filter keys”.

      Alternatively, launch Control Panel, select Ease of Access Center and select Make your computer easier to use.

      Uncheck Enable Filter Keys and click OK to save and then edit.

      Run the Windows 9 Hardware Troubleshooter0009

      Sometimes Windows can fix itself, depending on the nature of the problem. Windows 10 comes with a built-in troubleshooter that can diagnose and fix delays while typing on your PC keyboard. Use this tool to fix issues with a specific key or the entire keyboard.

      Go to Settings > Update & Security > Troubleshoot > Keyboard and click the “Run the troubleshooter” button.

      Wait while the troubleshooter scans your computer – this may take about 1-5 minutes – and follow the instructions on the next page. Use the following recommendation if the troubleshooter doesn’t find any issues with your keyboard.

      Restart your computer

      Close all applications and documents (to avoid losing unsaved changes) and restart your computer. If you are using an external or wireless keyboard, disconnect it from your computer before restarting. Connect or reconnect your keyboard when your computer turns back on and see if that fixes the typing lag.

      Update your keyboard driver

      Device drivers determine how your PC’s internal and external hardware components (such as display, keyboard, speakers, disk drives, etc.) interact with Windows. The device may fail if its driver is out of date.

      If your keyboard is delaying keystrokes when typing, go to Windows Device Manager and check if the keyboard driver is up to date.

      1. Right-click the Start menu icon (or press Windows Key + X) and select Device Manager.
      1. Expand the Keyboards category, right-click on the keyboard driver and select Update Device.
      1. Select Search automatically for updated driver software.

      Connect your computer to the Internet for best results. Wait for Windows to finish checking and install any available driver updates. If Windows says you have the latest driver, uninstall the driver (see steps below) and try again.

      Reinstall the keyboard driver

      You may experience delays when entering text if your PC keyboard driver is corrupted or incompatible with the keyboard. Fix it by uninstalling the driver; Windows will then install a new copy.

      1. Launch Device Manager, right-click the keyboard driver, and select Uninstall device.
      1. Select “Delete” at the confirmation prompt to continue.
      1. To reinstall the keyboard driver, select Action from the Device Manager menu bar and select Scan for hardware changes.

      Restarting the computer will also reinstall the keyboard driver.

      Change keyboard properties

      What’s great about Windows is that it offers a lot of customization options. If the delay occurs when you hold down a key or press it multiple times, follow these steps to adjust the “Character Repeat Settings” on your keyboard.

      Press the Windows key + R to open the Run Windows window.

      1. Type or paste a control keyboard into the dialog box and click OK.

      Adjust the Snooze Delay or Snooze Rate slider to fix the delay when typing. Before you do that, here’s what both options mean:

      • Repeat Delay: Describes how long you have to hold down a key before Windows repeats the input on your screen.
      • Repeat Rate: This setting describes the speed at which you want Windows to repeat a keystroke when you hold down a key.

      To fix keyboard delay when typing, increase the Snooze Rate (from slow to fast) and decrease the Snooze Delay (from long to short). Please note that a high repeat rate and a short repeat delay can also lead to unintentional duplication of keystrokes. Experiment with these options until you find the perfect balance.

      1. Click and hold any key in an empty dialog to check the keyboard repeat rate before closing the dialog. Select OK to save changes.

      Wi-Fi Interference Eliminator

      You may experience a delay when entering text on a wireless keyboard if your Wi-Fi router is close to your computer. This is because the signal from your router can interfere with the Bluetooth keyboard signal. To prevent this from happening, you can turn off Wi-Fi or move your computer away from the router. This fixed the issue for some Windows 10 users.

      Perform a clean reboot

      Some system (and third-party) applications and services start automatically when the computer boots. While some of these services help your computer run, they can sometimes slow down your PC and other applications.

      A clean boot will boot Windows with only the required applications, drivers, and programs. This can resolve the conflict and help you determine if an application or service is responsible for the delay in typing. Refer to this guide on how to perform a clean boot on Windows 10 Learn more.

      Check for dirt and damage to the hardware

      Your keyboard may not be able to register keystrokes if dirt, dust, or other foreign matter is trapped under the keys. The problem can also be related to physical damage to the keyboard or memory module of your PC.

      Clean the keyboard, and if you can, remove your PC’s memory module and plug it in properly. We recommend taking your computer to an authorized service center to have it done. Do not attempt this yourself to avoid damaging the keyboard and other components of the device.

      Enjoy lag-free typing

      If keyboard lag persists, try resetting your keyboard settings to factory defaults. You can also try performing a system restore if the issue occurred after installing a new driver, OS update, or third-party software.

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      7 ways to fix keyboard input lag in Windows 10 • Okie Doki

      Keyboard lag can distract you, especially when you are working on something important and the keyboard refuses to cooperate. If you’re a writer, web developer, programmer, or a pro who spends hours typing keys, this problem can slow you down.

      Before troubleshooting the problem, make sure that the problem is indeed with the keyboard. Sometimes, you may inadvertently do something that slows down your Windows PC, which can also be the cause of keyboard input lag. However, if this is not the case, here are a few simple fixes you can try to get rid of the annoying keyboard input lag.

      1. Disable filter keys

      Filter keys are a special feature that tells Windows to ignore brief or repeated keystrokes. This could potentially be the cause of keyboard output lag. You can fix this by disabling filter keys in keyboard settings.

      Open Settings by searching for “settings” in the Start menu. Select “Ease of Access” and scroll down to the “Keyboard” section in the right pane. Click “Keyboard” and find “Use filter keys”.

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      Under this heading you will find a toggle button. If it is enabled, disable it and close the Settings app.

      Then try typing something in a text editor and see if it still slows down.

      2. Update or reinstall the keyboard driver.

      Your system driver tells your computer how to handle external hardware such as a keyboard. If your keyboard driver is out of date, it will be difficult for your computer to communicate with the hardware. So an outdated driver is a possible cause of delayed keyboard input.

      There are several ways to find and replace outdated Windows drivers. The most common method is to use Device Manager.

      To update the driver with this method, press Win + R and launch the Device Manager by typing “devmgmt.msc” and pressing Enter. When Device Manager opens, locate your keyboard driver and right-click it. Select Update driver.

      You can enable Windows to automatically search for drivers or select “Search My Computer for Drivers” if you have downloaded updated drivers from the manufacturer’s website.

      However, if the keyboard input lag is caused by a driver corruption or incompatibility, you will need to reinstall the keyboard driver. Thus, you need to uninstall the current driver from Device Manager.

      Right-click the keyboard driver and select Uninstall device. Confirm the deletion when prompted. Then click “Action” in the menu bar at the top of Device Manager and click “Scan for hardware changes”.

      Alternatively, you can simply restart your computer and the keyboard driver will be reinstalled automatically. When you’re done, check if the input lag issue is resolved.

      3. Change the keyboard properties.

      Changing some keyboard properties can help eliminate input lag. Start by pressing Win + R, typing “control keyboard” and pressing Enter. The keyboard properties window will open, where you will see the option to adjust the snooze delay and snooze rate.

      Repeat Delay allows you to set a delay between pressing and holding a key and initiating a key re-out. The repeat rate allows you to control the speed at which this output is repeated.

      Reduce the snooze delay and increase the snooze rate to eliminate input lag. It may take some experimentation before you hit the sweet spot, but there’s a handy test box built right into the Keyboard Properties window to help you find the right balance. When you find your ideal snooze delay and snooze rate, click OK at the bottom to save and exit.

      4. Run the Keyboard Troubleshooter.

      Fortunately, Windows has some great built-in troubleshooting tools. If you’re experiencing input lag or your keyboard isn’t working at all, the keyboard troubleshooter can provide you with a solution.

      Open the Settings app to use the keyboard troubleshooter. Then go to Update & Security > Troubleshoot and you will see a list of recommended troubleshooters. If they are not there, just click “Advanced troubleshooters” and look for “Keyboard”. Click on it and select Run the troubleshooter.

      The troubleshooter will look for possible problems. If it finds something to fix, go ahead and follow the instructions. When you’re done, see if the issue is resolved.

      5. Use the DISM command line tool.

      DISM is an administrator-level command-line tool that you can use to restore the Windows image of your system. This tool can help fix keyboard input lag when it’s caused by a bug rooted deep in your Windows image that the system file checker can’t fix.

      Start by running Command Prompt or PowerShell as an administrator. Then run the following commands in this order:

      DISM /Online / Clean Image / ScanHealth
      DISM / Online / Cleanup-Image / CheckHealth
      DISM / Online / Cleanup-Image / RestoreHealth

      Wait for the process to complete and then check if this trick solved the keyboard input lag.

      6. Corrections for wireless keyboards.

      The above problems apply to keyboards in general. However, some issues are specific to wireless keyboards. If your keyboard is wireless, try the following fixes.

      Replace batteries

      Start by eliminating the possibility of delay due to a dead battery. To do this, replace the battery or fully charge the keyboard. If this does not resolve the issue, try the next solution.

      Check connection

      Start by trying to re-sync the keyboard with the USB receiver.