Sony oled tv reviews: The best OLED TV 2023: OLED panels from LG, Sony and more

Sony A95K QD-OLED TV review: next-gen OLED TV is breathtaking

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Sony’s first QD-OLED TV might not be a game-changer, but it is brilliant
Tested at £2699 / $3000 / AU$TBC

(Image: © Future / Netflix, Clark)

What Hi-Fi? Verdict

The upgrades are more subtle than perhaps expected, but the A95K is nonetheless one of the very best OLED TVs you can buy

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Pros
  • +

    Supremely natural, authentic picture

  • +

    Bright highlights that others miss

  • +

    Excellent sound by TV standards

Cons
  • LG OLEDs are better for gaming

  • Not outright brighter than the best ‘standard’ OLEDs

  • Bravia CAM’s usefulness is dubious

Why you can trust What Hi-Fi?
Our expert team reviews products in dedicated test rooms, to help you make the best choice for your budget. Find out more about how we test.

QD-OLED, which is (broadly speaking) designed to blend the best qualities of both OLED and QLED, made its debut last year in this, the Sony A95K.

OLED has become the premium TV technology of choice thanks to its perfect blacks, pixel-level contrast control, near-perfect viewing angles, super-thin designs and increasingly aggressive pricing, and QD-OLED is designed to overcome its main limitation – brightness.

If you’re therefore expecting the A95K to be vastly brighter than the OLED norm, you might be slightly disappointed. In fact, it’s fair to say that the first QD-OLED TV isn’t a huge leap in quality over the best standard OLED TVs you can currently buy. It is better, though, and that makes it a truly exceptional TV.

  • Sony XR-55A95K at Sevenoaks for £2,199

Price

(Image credit: Future / Netflix, Clark)

The 55-inch A95K we’re reviewing here (XR-55A95K to give its full title) was priced at £2699 / $3000 at launch. It’s now been available for over a year but it’s not dropped in price as much as one might expect – £2199 / $2500 seems to be the norm.

That means it’s vastly more expensive than Samsung’s 55-inch S95B (£1399 / $1450), which was launched at the same time as the Sony and with which it shares a panel. In fact, the Sony A95K is still much more expensive than Samsung flagship second-generation QD-OLED model, the new S95C (£1699 / $2165).

Samsung’s Display division is, as it happens, currently the only manufacturer of QD-OLED TV panels, just as LG Display manufactures all of the panels used in standard OLED TVs.

LG isn’t going down without a fight, either, and has this year launched its answer to QD-OLED with its super-bright, MLA-boosted G3, which will set you back £2399 / $2700.

(Image credit: Future)

Sony has designed the A95K to be as minimalist as possible. With the stand in its default position behind the TV, all you see from the front is the screen surrounded on three sides by a 7-8mm bezel and on the bottom by a thicker lip that houses elements such as the IR receiver and far-field microphones and displays a very subtle Sony logo. In this position, the set has a slight lean backwards that should compensate for it standing lower on your furniture than would a TV with a more typical stand.

Alternatively, the stand can be positioned in front of the screen so that the TV can be positioned more or less flush against a wall. To these eyes that’s actually the more striking of the two positioning options, but which will suit you will depend on your room and furniture. Wall-mounting is of course also an option, with the stand detaching entirely.

At 4.3cm the A95K is just a smidge thinner than the LG C2 and C3 (both 4.5cm) but a fair bit thicker than the G2 and G3 (both 2.5cm). Because the plastic chassis section at the back covers more of the set’s rear than is typical of an OLED, it could possibly be mistaken for a backlit TV, with only a small section of OLED super-slimness on display. This rear enclosure has a grid pattern that makes the TV’s behind a little more interesting than that of most other sets, and plastic panels can be used to hide the connections and cables.

Features

(Image credit: Future)

Towards the top of the back panel is an unusual rectangular notch. This is for the Bravia CAM camera, which comes with the A95K (and the Z9K 8K MiniLED TV) and magnetically attaches at this point, peeking over the top edge of the screen.

While at launch the Bravia CAM only offered video chat functionality, it does now support the promised Ambient Optimisation Pro (which adjusts picture and sound based on where you are in the room), Proximity Alert (which is designed to prevent children from standing or sitting too close to the TV), Gesture Control and Auto Power Saving Mode (which detects when you’ve left the room and dims the screen) features. Some people may find some of these features useful, but we think that most buyers will ignore them. In fact, they might never bother connecting the camera. We can’t help but wonder how much it’s added to the A95K’s overall price and rather wish Sony had instead made it an optional extra.

If you prefer to interact with your TV the more traditional way, you’ll be pleased to discover that the A95K comes with a remote that’s 36 per cent smaller than last year’s zapper, with a reduction in buttons from 49 to 25. It feels good in the hands, has well-spaced, pleasingly clicky and – best of all – backlit buttons, and Sony has even added a neat and genuinely useful finder function that has the remote emit a sound when you say ‘Okay Google, find my remote’ to the TV. A basic, plastic remote is also included in the box (at least in Europe). It’s rather cheap and nasty, with very spongy buttons, but you should rarely if ever need to use it.

Sony XR-55A95K tech specs

(Image credit: Future / Netflix, Clark)

Screen size 55 inches (also available in 65in)

Type QD-OLED

Resolution 4K

HDR formats HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system Google TV

HDMI inputs x4

HDMI 2.1 48Gbps, x2

Gaming features 4K/120, VRR, ALLM

Input lag 21ms

ARC/eARC eARC

Optical output Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand) 71 x 123 x 4. 3cm

Sony uses the Google TV operating system for most of its TVs, including the A95K. Overall, this is a very good platform that’s pretty snappy in use here and puts increasingly intelligent personalised recommendations front and centre, making it very quick to find something new to watch or to jump back into. Unfortunately, the vast majority of recommendations presented are still from Amazon Prime Video and Disney+, with just a couple of Apple TV titles and a single My5 TV show thrown in. That Netflix is missing from the recommendation engine is clearly an issue, but it’s not one that’s exclusive to Google TV or Sony.

There is of course a Netflix app on the TV, complete with Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos support. The aforementioned Disney+, Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV are all present and largely correct (Disney+ is lacking Atmos support), as are all of the major music streaming services. In the UK you also get Now and BT Sport, and all of the main catch-up services are present both as individual apps and as part of the YouView TV platform. There’s also a Freesat tuner for those who want or need to get their live TV service via satellite.

The A95K of course also features Sony’s own Bravia Core service, which delivers blockbuster movies in noticeably higher quality than you get from rival services – assuming you’ve got the internet speeds (80Mbps+ for the maximum quality) to handle it. You get 10 credits that can be redeemed against films in Bravia Core when you buy your TV.

On the gaming front, the A95K is very similarly specced to Sony’s 2021 OLEDs but with one key exception – VRR works right out of the box. On top of that, there are two 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 ports that support 4K 120Hz gaming from the PS5, Xbox Series X and the latest PC graphics cards. Unfortunately, one of those HDMI 2.1 sockets also handles eARC (Enhanced Audio Return Channel), so if you need that for a soundbar or AV receiver, you’ll have just one HDMI 2.1 input left.

ALLM is supported by the A95K, as is the PS5-specific version called Auto Genre Picture Mode. There’s unfortunately no HGiG setting or a Dolby Vision Game mode, but the A95K does support Auto HDR Tone Mapping, which allows a PS5 to detect the specific model of TV to which it’s connected and automatically select the appropriate HDR tone map – although we recommend that you manually calibrate anyway as we found the recommended settings to be just a smidge off. Input lag, meanwhile, measures 21ms, which is not as fast as some but will be completely imperceptible to most (if not all) gamers.

Of course, the most exciting feature of the A95K is its QD-OLED panel, which Sony has apparently enhanced through the use of a heat diffusion sheet that distributes heat more effectively, and temperature distribution mapping that helps prevent image retention.

Sony’s Cognitive Processor XR, which was first introduced in 2021, has a big role to play in terms of getting the most out of the QD-OLED panel, with an enhanced version of its Flexible Colour Contrast Control feature seemingly designed to make the most of the potential extra vibrancy made available by the new panel technology. There’s also a new ‘Depth Map’ feature that identifies and enhances near objects while slightly suppressing the background in order to increase depth perception.

Picture

(Image credit: Future / Netflix, Clark)

Kicking off with Rogue One in Dolby Vision, the depth and solidity of the image is immediately striking. The Rebel Alliance U-Wing ship stands out brilliantly from the desert landscape of Jedha, while the mountain-top city and Star Destroyer hovering above it are reproduced with exceptional three-dimensionality. This solidity is the result of a combination of factors: excellent sharpness, loads of fine detail, brilliant contrast and, in all likelihood, Sony’s Depth Map feature.

Of the A95K’s two Dolby Vision picture presets, Dolby Vision Dark is best avoided – it’s simply too dark, even in a pitch black room, with too much detail lost to shadows. Dolby Vision Bright is excellently judged though, providing deep, detailed blacks with plenty of contrasting pop. What may surprise you, though, is that the A95K is no brighter than the LG G2 overall. In fact, in many scenes it’s LG’s top OLED Evo model that looks brighter.

Where the A95K QD-OLED comes up trumps is in the detail and colour contained within the brightest highlights. The A95K provides a lovely, subtle orange warmth that gradually fades towards the centre of a sunset but never truly disappears, whereas the G2 is largely white in the brightest areas. There’s more detail and shading to the bright, white clouds over Scarif from the A95K, too. This is where the new technology seemingly pays off: it’s not brighter than the brightest traditional OLED TV, but it does offer better brightness.

Switching to No Time To Die in HDR10, these excellent traits remain and our attention turns to the A95K’s overall colour balance, which is exemplary. It’s easy during one of the scenes at the beginning of the film (when Bond is watching Madeleine in the sea) for a TV to exaggerate Daniel Craig’s tan so that he looks slightly nuclear, but the Sony falls into no such trap, ensuring he looks healthily burnished but natural, while the scenery retains its glorious orange warmth.

A quick hop over to the Blade Runner 2049 4K Blu-ray (okay, we watched it from start to finish for the millionth time) proves that Sony remains the master of motion processing. The company’s rivals have made significant progress in this area over the last couple of years, but neither the G2 nor Samsung S95B can match the A95K’s combination of complete control over shimmer in tricky, unpredictable motion with a total lack of introduced unrealism.

The A95K proves to be an excellent performer with HD content, too. There’s a punch and dynamism to its recreation of Ex Machina that’s at once thrilling and natural, and the upscaling combines sharpness, clarity and cleanliness in a way that simply looks correct. Colours, meanwhile, are just as well balanced with this SDR film as they are with the HDR content we watch. You simply never question the A95K’s delivery, and that’s one of the greatest compliments we can pay any TV.

It does an admirable job with the standard-def delivery of Garden Rescue, too, reproducing the vibrant colours of Charlie Dimmock’s latest design without pushing them to garish levels, and combining crispness and control to a very impressive degree. Daytime TV has rarely looked this good.

Sound

(Image credit: Future)

For the A95K’s sound, Sony is using the same Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology (which uses actuators that vibrate the whole screen in order to make sound) that features in all of the company’s OLEDs, albeit with larger actuators that are specifically optimised for the new QD-OLED panel. These two actuators combine with two subwoofers for added bass.

The resulting sound is very good indeed by TV standards. During the very tricky opening to chapter 2 of the Blade Runner 2049 4K Blu-ray, the A95K starts strong, with plenty of weight and punch to the tricky bass notes that cause so much trouble for the speakers of most TV sound systems. The soundtrack builds in volume over the course of a couple of minutes, but most TVs hit their dynamic limit within the first 10-20 seconds. Not so the A95K which, even close to its highest volume setting, continues to build right up to the intended crescendo. And, unless your starting point is very high indeed (above the 75-mark, which is very loud on this TV), there’s impressive control to the delivery. Push it beyond this point and a little fizz and brittleness creeps in, but we’re talking about volumes that are too loud for comfort anyway – and volumes that most TVs can only dream of.

There’s good detail and clarity to the delivery, too. And, as is the norm for Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio TVs, the sound is tied to the onscreen action (it is, after all, literally coming from the screen) in a way that typical TVs can’t match. That isn’t to say that the sound produced is narrow or constrained, as it also stretches a good way out to the sides and even above the TV screen, though not in a way that could be described as virtual surround or Atmos.

To cut an already fairly long story short, while most TVs will be sonically improved by almost any soundbar, it would take something genuinely excellent to significantly upgrade the A95K’s sound. A Sonos Beam Gen 2 would do the job, but something along the lines of the Arc should be considered a more appropriate starting point.

On the subject of serious sound, the A95K continues the flagship Sony TV tradition of having speaker terminals so that the TV can take the place of a centre speaker in a surround sound system. However, while the A95K sounds very good for a TV, it’s very unlikely that it will have anything like the same sonic character as your other speakers, and even the best AV receiver will struggle to compensate for the differences. It’s a similar story with the Acoustic Centre Sync feature, which is designed to utilise the TV’s speakers when it’s partnered with specific Sony sound solutions such as the HT-A7000 soundbar and HT-A9 speaker system. While closer, the tonal differences are still too pronounced for there to be genuine harmony across the front of the soundfield. Our advice is that you either use the TV’s built-in speakers or, preferably, use a dedicated sound system.

Verdict

(Image credit: Future)

While not the new dawn of TV technology that some may have expected, the Sony A95K pushed the OLED game on in terms of both detail and colour reproduction in the brightest parts of the picture.

Samsung’s S95B is more of an all-guns-blazing demo of QD-OLED’s abilities, and for some its exceptional punch and vibrancy will be impossible to ignore. However, Sony’s careful, authenticity-led approach means the A95K is more balanced and natural, and the fine detail, sharpness and three-dimensionality of its image are superb.

The one thing holding the A95K back is its price, which hasn’t come down as much as one might have expected. That you can buy the newer Samsung S95C or LG G3 for less will be a stumbling block for many, and it’s worth noting that Sony’s own second-generation QD-OLED model, the A95L, is coming soon.

Even so, the A95K remains a TV of rare talent despite its age, and it’s a great buy if you can find it at the right price.

SCORES

  • Picture 5
  • Sound 5
  • Features 4

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Sony XR-55A95K: Price Comparison

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Tom Parsons has been writing about TV, AV and hi-fi products (not to mention plenty of other ‘gadgets’ and even cars) for over 15 years. He began his career as What Hi-Fi?’s Staff Writer and is now the TV and AV Editor. In between, he worked as Reviews Editor and then Deputy Editor at Stuff, and over the years has had his work featured in publications such as T3, The Telegraph and Louder. He’s also appeared on BBC News, BBC World Service, BBC Radio 4 and Sky Swipe. In his spare time Tom is a runner and gamer.

Sony Bravia XR A95K OLED TV review: The best 4K TV ever

At a glance

Expert’s Rating

Pros

  • Fantastic image quality
  • Great sound
  • Handsome industrial design

Cons

  • Very expensive

Our Verdict

Sony’s Bravia XR A95K-series TV delivers fantastic color, brightness, black, processing, and sound. It’s arguably the best smart TV on the market–and it’s priced to support that theory.

This Sony Bravia XR A95K-series is the second TV we’ve seen based on Samsung Display’s new RGB OLED technology. It’s also arguably the best (by a slim margin) thanks to Sony’s processing and audio expertise and a superior smart TV user interface (Google TV). We like it. A lot.

Buying the best OLED TV, however, will cost you: At the time of this review, the 65-inch model we tested was on sale for between $2,879 and $3,000–about $1,200 more than Samsung’s very competitive S95B ($1,800 on sale), and almost $900 more than LG’s still excellent C2/G2 OLEDs ($2,000 on sale).

This review is part of TechHive’s in-depth coverage of the best smart TVs.

By far the most notable feature of the Sony’s A95K-series is its 120Hz, 3840 x 2160, pure RGB OLED display. If you’re not familiar, the LG OLEDS that have held sway over this market segment for the last few years are WRGB. That is, they use a fourth white sub-pixel to increase peak brightness when needed. WRGB works very well, but tends to reduce color saturation in bright spots. In spite of this, LG OLEDs have very good color accuracy the vast majority of the time.

The pure RGB technology in the A95K-series uses only red, green, and blue sub-pixels, so it maintains color saturation when highlights get brighter. In our testing, it seems Sony plays up this advantage and over-saturates at some points. I say “over,” but the effect is extremely pleasing to the eye.

The A95K’s other outstanding feature is its use of the display glass as a planar speaker. The rear-mounted impellers, driven by 60 watts of total power, vibrate the panel to very good effect, making it one of the few TVs whose sound you won’t feel an immediate need to augment.

Back to the more mundane aspects: The 65-inch unit Sony sent us is very thin: 1.75-inches at the caboose used to house its electronics and those sound impellers. It sits on a rather massive stand, bolted to two L-brackets that themselves bolt to the stands. The whole deal with its extremely thin bezel is very attractive, as you can see in the image below.

This side angle shows the Sony Bravia XR A95K’s unique stand.

The 65-inch Bravia XR A95K weighs just under 60 pounds, with the stand contributing another 30 or so pounds. It was a bit of a bear to wrestle myself, but doable. I suggest help from a friend, which wasn’t available to me at the time. The VESA mount point is a 300mm x 300mm pattern.

Port selection is top notch: Four HDMI ports, two of which support 120Hz refresh rates, variable refresh rate (VRR), and auto low-latency mode (ALLM). One HDMI port also supports eARC. You’ll also find a coax connection for an over-the-air TV antenna or cable/satellite set-top box, ethernet, composite audio with a center speaker input, optical S/PDIF) audio out, RS-232, and two USB-A ports (one at the side of the TV, the other near the bottom).

This pure side view shows some of the A95K’s ports. The others face down on the underside of the cavity.

There’s a Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) adapter on board, and the Bluetooth radio features latency compensation. There’s support for HDR10 (but not DR10+), Dolby Vision, HLG, Calman auto calibration, DTS Digital Surround, Dolby Atmos (and precursors). There are a number of sound modes (EQ) as well as faux 3D audio upscaling. The TV automatically adjusts its audio for room conditions during setup.

I stream movies across my local network, and the onboard media player (which also supports USB mass storage) has matured into a top-notch entity with exceptionally wide codec support.

In short, there’s little state-of-the-art missing from this TV.

Sony Bravia XR A95-series’ smart TV interface and remote control

Sony uses the Google TV interface here, which has matured into a reasonably efficient and navigable creation. I quite liked that the home row is occupied by the input and main settings icons rather than content Sony is selling.

The voice remote, which supports Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa, is the vastly improved, smaller, more focused model Sony started shipping last year. It’s backlit for use in dark environs and sports dedicated buttons for settings, input, and transport control. I like its balance of minimalism and functionality quite a bit more than Samsung’s austere remotes that force you onscreen for almost every task.

The A95K’s bundled voice remote has a nice feel and is far classier in appearance than the company’s old-school remotes.

I will also say that the Sony remote feels nice in the hand. While I appreciate Samsung’s solar-rechargeable One Remote from an environmental point of view, the slightly greater heft of Sony’s battery-powered remote provides more substantial tactile feedback. That said, you still need to use onscreen selectors to enter numbers and the like. Sigh.

As far as user interface/remote synergy is concerned, you can change settings and see the effect in real time, which can make all the difference if you’re tailoring the picture for specific content. There are a host of options for that task–far more than the non-videophile likely wants or needs. I was fine with the template settings Sony provides: Standard, Cinema, IMAX, and so on.

All in all, I found using Sony’s A95K significantly more efficient than Samsung’s Tizen-based S95B.

The Sony Bravia XR A95K-series’ picture and sound quality

While the A95K’s image isn’t perfect, it’s darn close. The color is rich and spot on to the naked eye, there’s plenty of peak brightness (without blowing out color, thanks to the panel being pure RGB rather than RGBW), and the blacks are; well, this is an OLED TV, so the blacks are great.

I would be remiss, however, if I didn’t inform you that Sony’s A95K is not quite as bright as Samsung’s S95B. It’s not really noticeable in real life, but there is a slight drop-off, likely on purpose, as both TVs use the same basic panel technology.

If I were to be picky, the gradients in the dark end of the spectrum weren’t as accurate as they are with LG’s WRGB panel, but it’s a worthwhile trade-off most users will never notice.

Screen uniformity is awesome, viewing angles are superbly wide, there’s no blooming around bright objects and the overall picture is in a word: lush. That’s standard for OLED, though, and I did notice a bit of glare from some steep viewing angles, but only when the test room’s harsh and bright lighting was at full blast.

The A95K features a heat dissipation layer that’s absent from Samsung’s and LG’s OLEDs. This allows the TV to remain bright if you have a constant highlight present on-screen. As for how Sony handles burn-in (elements that remain visible, as with old CRTs if you left a static image in place too long) under such circumstances, I don’t know, and I didn’t want to find out on Sony’s dime. Suffice it to say that OLED panels are not the best technology for static image display.

Processing defects were exceedingly rare and minor. There was a touch of shimmer and moiré, but not on the scale you’ll see with LED-backlit LCD TVs. The same can be said for rendering fine lines and jaggies.

Note that Sony’s Motionflow smoothing setting didn’t cure the A95K’s judder issues, only increasing the CineMotion value tamed it–and tamed it well. Motion was very smooth.

The sound, thanks to Sony’s planar drivers, is spectacular for a flat-screen TV. It won’t replace top-tier outboard gear, but lay off purchasing a soundbar until you hear it–you might just decide you don’t need one. Most notably, the TV actually produces bass. And not a minuscule amount either.

Additionally, the A95K also supports Sony’s 3D audio devices such as the the SRS-NS7 neckband speakers we reviewed recently.

The Sony Bravia XR A95K-series is fantastic, but pricey

So, the Sony Bravia XR A95K is likely the best 4K UHD TV we’ve ever seen. But its primary competition–the 65-inch Samsung S95B–was selling for $1,200 less at the time of this review, and Samsung’s picture-processing prowess is just a gnat’s eyebrow behind Sony’s. During everyday use, you’ll be hard-pressed to tell the difference. LG offers even cheaper OLED TVs, some of which are still among our favorites.

If you want the absolute best smart TV, you want one from the Sony Bravia XR A95K-series. If you don’t care about the two to five percent improvement you might never notice, a more efficient user interface (LG’s WebOS is also far better than Samsung’s Tizen), or superior onboard sound quality, then the competition offers the better bottom-line value.

Sony A80K – 2022 OLED TV review

In addition to adding a 77-inch diagonal to the lineup, these TVs differ from the A95K in a redesigned panel structure.

The A95K TV series uses a QD-OLED panel developed by SamsungDisplay. The A80K lineup, in turn, is equipped with WOLED matrices manufactured by LG. In our review of the Sony XR-65A80K OLED 4K HDR 65-inch TV, we will analyze its advantages and disadvantages to see if it is worth your attention.

XRPhase 2 Cognitive Processor

At the show, Sony also introduced a new iteration of the XR Cognitive Processor Phase 2, which the model in question is equipped with. Representatives of the company claim that thanks to him, new TVs are able to display colors with a huge number of additional shades. After all, now in addition to the brightness in the device, you can also adjust the saturation.

Depth of the image is also improved due to better control of the foreground objects. In other words, now most of the video processing systems (color, fidelity, and so on) are concentrated on the foreground of the picture, and not on the background.

This technology can be compared with the Bokeh effect, created specifically to increase the realism of the image and the resemblance to the way a person sees it. In addition to the updated XR Cognitive Processor – the most powerful ever developed by the company – the TV has a 10-bit panel with a refresh rate of 100 Hz.

XR OLED Contrast Pro

Nothing was said about the peak brightness of the Sony XR-65A80K during the presentation. However, according to the manufacturer, the maximum brightness of the A80K will be no less than that of Sony A9 devices. 0J which were released in 2021.

This explanation was made because the new devices are equipped with Sony XR OLED Contrast Pro technology. In addition to increasing brightness, this tool preserves color density with a large volume of colors. However, you should not expect something supernatural if there is no proper cooling of the LEDs.

XR Upscaling 4K

Japanese engineers have improved XR Upscaling 4K technology with the power of the new 2022 XR Cognitive Processor. Previously, this technology was called X-Reality Pro. The new algorithm works at the expense of the image database, which is designed for texturing.

The technology works by detecting and analyzing each object in an image. The display of greater depth and sharper texture is due to individual system optimization. This is necessary to increase the realism and naturalness of the image.

Sony’s A80K TVs also feature XR Motion Clarity to smooth motion pictures, as well as the exclusive XR Triluminos Pro color enhancement feature. Like previous models, the new Sony A80K supports Dolby Vision, HLG and HDR10 formats.

Smart Google TV

The 2022 Sony TV operating system is GoogleTV OS. This OS organizes and consolidates all streaming subscriptions and apps just like AndroidTV. The main difference between these systems is that in GoogleTV apps are at the bottom of the menu.

GoogleTV prioritizes the display of content based on related topics. There are over 700,000 movies on the system, as well as over 6,500 apps, including YouTube, Canal+, Netflix, and Disney+. To find something that you would like to watch, you no longer need to switch between different services.

Hundreds of thousands of series and films are available for viewing, regardless of the year they were released. To implement all the functionality of the operating system, as well as for the smoothness and responsiveness of the interface, the same improved XR cognitive processor is used.

Sony A80K TVs are still equipped with Google Assistant voice assistant and a microphone built into the remote control. Voice commands can also be given directly to the screen without using the remote control. A smartphone is required to implement this function. Among other things, the TV can also work with Amazon Alexa using the AmazonEcho speaker, as well as HomeKit and AirPlay 2.

Bravia camera features

The Sony Bravia A80K remote control has also received some changes. Unlike what was used in 2021, the new model does not have a backlight. Its size is 36% smaller. The number of buttons has also been reduced, now there are 25 of them instead of 42. One of the interesting features is the “Remote Search” function, which works due to the Bravia camera connected to the TV via USB.

If you cannot find the remote, you can say the command out loud. In addition to searching for the remote control using the camera, it is possible to control the TV using gestures. There are many other features of BraviaCam. The camera can trigger the display of a text message and a sound alert if a person is too close to the TV screen (this feature is very useful if there are children in the house).

The camera also helps save energy by automatically dimming the screen when no one is in the room. At the same time, if privacy is important to you, then the camera can be completely turned off by pressing just one button. Neither the TV nor the camera store any personal data of users.

Ambient Optimization Pro

The Ambient Optimization Pro mode has also been developed by the company’s engineers for the television camera. Previously, the camera automatically adjusted the image quality and sound according to the room. In addition, the camera read the surrounding devices (light level, noise in the room, and so on). Now BraviaCam can automatically adjust the device depending on the distance to the viewer, and the sound is balanced based on the location of the person in front of the screen.

Bravia Core

Sony A80K devices keep up with other BraviaXR TVs by providing the exclusive BraviaCore streaming platform for such models. It contains mostly animated films from Sony Pictures. When you purchase a Bravia XR TV, Sony gives you the opportunity to view a selection of the best films from this studio for free for 24 months. You can watch it in excellent quality when streaming at a speed of 80 Mbps. At the same time, the list of films is constantly updated.

Acoustic Surface Audio+

The audio system of the Sony A80K is called Acoustic Surface Audio+. It includes three 10W speakers placed behind the front panel. Two more with a total power of 20 W are needed to reproduce low-frequency sounds (bass).

Like the 2021 models, the A80K supports DolbyAtmos and Acoustic Center Sync. The latter technology is similar to the Q-Symphony feature supported by Samsung QLED devices.

Perfectly compatible with PlayStation 5

Superb gaming experience when connected to PlayStation 5 with AutoGenrePictureMode and Auto HDR ToneMapping. Not least, the Sony A80K Bravia XR TVs can automatically switch from Standard mode to Gaming mode when a PlayStation 5 game console is connected. /With. Both support ALLM and VRR, and one of them also supports eARC. In addition, there are two more HDMI 2.0 ports with a bandwidth of 18 Gb / s.

The TV has 2 USB ports, an antenna jack, a composite video input, a miniJack for headphones, an optical TosLink audio jack, and Ethernet for a wired network connection. Like all modern Sony TVs, there is Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for wireless connections.

Features A80K

Shield

Display Technology

OLED

Diagonal size

65 in. (165 cm)

Matrix type

OLED

Matrix Bit / Bit / Color Depth

yes

Screen resolution

3840×2160 pixels (4K Ultra HD)

Aspect ratio / aspect ratio

16:9

Vertical frequency / Refresh rate

40 – 120 Hz

Viewing angle

178°

Brightness peak value

71%

Video

Image processor

Cognitive Processor XR

Dynamic Image Clarity Enhancement

XR Motion Clarity

High Dynamic Range (HDR)

yes

HDR 10 support

yes

Dolby Vision support

yes

Resolution scaling up to 4KUltraHD

yes

Contrast

OLED XR Contrast, XR HDR Remaster, Dynamic Lighting System Algorithm, Pixel Contrast Booster Technology

Brightness

300 cd/m²

Color rendering

XR Smoothing XR Triluminos Pro, Live Color Technology

Audio

Power output

20W (2x10W)

Speaker system

2. 2 CH

Subwoofer

10W (2x5W)

NICAM stereo audio support

yes

Surround

yes

DTS decoder

is

Dolby Atmos decoder

yes

Bluetooth audio support

yes

Voice processing algorithm

yes

Smart service

Smart TV

yes

Operating system

Android

Internal memory

16 GB

Web browser

yes

App Store

yes

Voice control

yes

Gesture control

no

TV control with smartphone

yes

Miracast function (mobile to TV)

yes

PC Network File Access (DLNA)

yes

Bluetooth Low Energy

yes

Voice assistant support

yes

Additional functions

Auto channel search

yes

Electronic TV guide

yes

Teletext in Russian (TTXT)

yes

TimeShift support

yes

On/off timer

yes

Sleep timer

yes

Tuner / broadcast

Digital terrestrial television

DVB-T2/T

Digital cable television

DVB-C

Digital satellite television

DVB-S2/S

Analog signal reception

yes

Color system

PAL, SECAM

CI (Common Interface) support

yes

Subtitles

yes

Connecting external devices

HDMI connector

4 pcs.

HDMI CEC

yes

USB connector

3 pcs.

Component input (Y/Pb/Pr)

no

Composite input (AV)

yes (S-CenterSpeaker hybrid input (1 side mini jack))

Ethernet (LAN)

yes

Audio output (3.5 mm headphone jack)

yes

Digital audio output (optical)

yes

Antenna input (RF)

yes

Built-in Wi-Fi module

yes

Bluetooth

yes

HDMI – ARC /

backward audio compatibility support

yes

Playback from digital media

Playback HEVC

yes

MP3 playback

yes

MPEG4 playback

yes

DivX playback

yes

Playback MKV

yes

JPEG playback

yes

WMA playback

have

Energy efficiency

Power supply

220 – 240 W, 50 Hz

Power consumption (max. )

154 W

Standby power consumption

0.50 W

Energy saving function

yes

Annual energy consumption (EU standard)

214 kWh per year

Packed dimensions and weight

Width

158 cm

Height

95.8 cm

Depth

18.4 cm

Weight

31 kg

Dimensions and weight with stand

Width

144.8 cm

Height

85. 9 cm

Depth

33 cm

Dimensions and weight without stand

Width

144.8 cm

Height

83.6 cm

Depth

5.3 cm

Weight

22.3 kg

Equipment

Table stand

yes

Wall Mount

no, optional

Remote control

yes

Batteries (for remote control)

yes

Power cable

yes

Documentation

yes

Additional information

Warranty

12 months

Color

black

Light effects (decor)

no

VESA compatible

300 x 300 mm

A80K review summary

At the end of the review, it is worth noting that, as before, the exact calibration of the A80K series TV is carried out thanks to the CalmanReady function. In addition to Netflix, ImaxEnhanced and Adaptive CalibratedMode certifications, BraviaCore calibration mode also appeared in 2022. The device perfectly adjusts its own settings to BraviaCore content to deliver impressive picture quality.

In terms of design, it can be noted that the legs of the TV can be placed in four different positions. They can be placed at the edges of the unit or closer to the center to mount the TV on a narrow surface. In addition, there is an opportunity to raise the TV to place an external soundbar under it. With the help of a bracket, the device is easily placed on the wall.

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Sony A90K gaming OLED TV review

This decision was reinforced by the addition of four HDMI 2.1 connectors to the devices for video signal transmission at 4K and 120 Hz and support for ALLM and VRR gaming options. The number of diagonally different models in the series has decreased to two.

Compared to the previous A90J series, the sound system has been simplified. However, all other characteristics of the A90K – the level of detail, sharpness of contours, contrast, motion processing, and so on – are impressive. A review of the XR-48A90K 4K HDR OLED TV from Sony will help you get acquainted with the capabilities of this device.

Design

There is nothing fundamentally new in the appearance of the Sony XR-48A90K. When you look at it, you can see exactly what the buyer expects from expensive TVs: a large screen and very thin bezels. Instead of legs like A90J the role of the stand is performed by a pedestal with supports. At the same time, the stand can be adjusted in height and raise the TV to fit under the screen of the soundbar. Thanks to its stability, the TV can be installed on almost any surface. There is also the possibility of mounting the TV on the wall using a VESA bracket.

The texture of the back panel has been changed – instead of longitudinal stripes there is now a square grid. Connectors for connections are located as before – still some of them look down, and some sideways. Thanks to the OLED panel, the thickness of the Sony A90K no more than 6 mm with a thickening of up to 4 cm in the area where the electronic filling and speakers are located.

Image quality

An enhanced panel and a new cognitive processor enhance the already excellent picture quality of OLED. XR OLED Contrast Pro technology provides the device with increased peak brightness and even deeper blacks with great detail.

Other cognitive image processing technologies also use the power of the new processor. For example, the XR TRILUMINOUS PRO works with HDR and SDR content to create an accurate color gamut for it. Whereas the X1 Ultimate chip previously used one base for XR 4K Upscaling, the new processor allows for two.

The Sony Bravia XR A90K has a complete set of calibration management tools. In addition, you can use the Calman for BRAVIA application to fully access the AutoCal system using Calman software to take advantage of the new image presets. Calibrating the picture of SDR content gives very good results.

OLED panel with XR OLED Contrast Pro technology offers one of the best HDR images on the market. What is the peak brightness of this screen? In the ten percent area after measurement, a value of 750 nits was obtained, and the value of a completely white screen was 170 nits.

In terms of HDR formats, A90K supports DolbyVision, HLG and HDR10. Support for HDR10+ and DolbyVisionIQ is missing. There are picture presets based on popular movies that are designed to watch video content as it was meant to be.

The Sony A90K TV has a small problem with the matrix and its black levels. Sometimes black flowers appear slightly lighter, while still showing more detail in the shadows of the image. However, it loses blacks when displaying very dark areas, and therefore looks a little compressed. Calibration does not fix this.

Motion processing and game mode

XR OLED Motion that inserts additional black frames during motion processing may cause screen artifacts during dynamic scenes, especially when the interpolation settings are increased. However, the picture smoothness of the Sony A90K TV is much higher and looks undeniably better than the competition.

When using the TV to connect game consoles (XboxSeriesX or PlayStation 5) to an A9 series TV0K, no performance issues have been noticed. In game mode, the device uses the full color scheme and HDR in most of the games. The image output delay is only 8.5ms.

As mentioned above, the TVs have HDMI 2.1 ports supporting 4K@120Hz, ALLM and VRR. As a result, the BRAVIA XR A90K provides an impressive gaming experience. Thanks to the high refresh rate of the screen, you can play games at high frame rates (up to 120 frames per second) without any problems. Such indicators are especially important when playing fast dynamic games. With Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), the TV can adjust the screen refresh rate while you play. Thanks to this feature, the gameplay is as smooth as possible, without gaps and delays. Thanks to ALLM (Automatic Low Latency Mode), the device is able to recognize the connection of a game console and switch to a mode suitable for gaming. It is worth noting that all the HDMI ports of the Sony A9 TV0K have version 2.1.

Smart TV

The Sony A90K TV uses the GoogleTV operating system to implement its smart features. It has most popular streaming services such as YouTube, Disney+, AmazonPrimeVideo, Netflix, as well as Peacock, HBOMax, AppleTV and many more. In addition to intuitive menu navigation, GoogleTV has voice control using Google Assistant.

In order to share files with compatible devices, the OS has a built-in Chromecast, and for Apple devices – AirPlay2. An updated remote control has been developed for Sony TVs in 2022. It lacks a pad with number keys, but it does have the ability to type using the on-screen keyboard.

The keys on the remote control are illuminated to control the TV in the dark. The TV supports the optional BraviaCam. It is necessary for video communication and voice control without using the remote control. Ambient Optimization Pro can use the camera to track your location in the room to optimize the sound and picture for the situation.

Sound

With Acoustic Surface Audio+, the sound quality of the Sony A90K is excellent. This was achieved by placing actuators behind the screen that transmit vibration to it to create additional sound sources. This allows you to create the feeling that the picture itself sounds exactly in those places where the sound should come from. With the panel itself becoming a speaker, the sound quality is very impressive.

With AcousticCenterSync, it is possible to synchronize the speakers of the Sony XR A90K TV with soundbars from Sony. This allows you to boost the center channel and create a much more exciting and full sound. It can be added to a home theater as a center speaker for a multi-channel system, but its sound and tone will be different. To summarize, the sound quality of this model is well above average and can replace the use of an average soundbar.

Connections

All connections are located on the rear panel and exit sideways and downwards. The CI slot is located on the side. Below it is a 3.5 mm minijack, a composite video input and a separate audio output for connecting a soundbar. There are also two USB connectors, HDMI 2.1 with eARC and a microphone switch.

Downward-facing USB 3.0 connector, three more HDMI 2.1 ports, optical digital audio output, Ethernet, and a pair of antenna connectors. Wireless connections use Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

Features A90K

Shield

Display Technology

OLED

Diagonal size

48 inches (121.92 cm)

Matrix type

OLED

Matrix Bit / Bit / Color Depth

yes

Screen resolution

3840×2160 pixels (4K Ultra HD)

Aspect ratio / aspect ratio

16:9

Vertical frequency / Refresh rate

40 – 120 Hz

Viewing angle

178°

Brightness peak value

71%

Video

Image Processor

Cognitive Processor XR

Dynamic Image Clarity Enhancement

XR Motion Clarity

High Dynamic Range (HDR)

yes

HDR 10 support

have

Dolby Vision support

yes

Resolution scaling up to 4KUltraHD

yes

Contrast

OLED XR Contrast, XR HDR Remaster, Dynamic Backlight System Algorithm, Pixel Contrast Booster 9 Technology0003

Color rendering

XR Smoothing XR Triluminos Pro, Live Color Technology

Audio

Power output

25 W (2 x 10; 1 x 5 W)

Speaker system

2. 1

Subwoofer

yes

NICAM stereo audio support

yes

Surround

yes

DTS decoder

yes

Dolby Atmos decoder

yes

Smart service

Smart TV

yes

Operating system

Android

Internal memory

16 GB

Web browser

yes

App Store

yes

Voice control

yes

Gesture control

no

TV control with smartphone

yes

Miracast function (mobile to TV)

yes

PC Network File Access (DLNA)

yes

Bluetooth Low Energy

yes

Additional functions

Auto channel search

yes

Electronic TV guide

yes

Teletext in Russian (TTXT)

yes

Sleep timer

yes

Favorite channels

yes

Tuner / broadcast

Digital terrestrial television

DVB-T2/T

Digital cable television

DVB-C

Digital satellite television

DVB-S2/S

Analog signal reception

yes

Color system

PAL, SECAM

CI (Common Interface) support

yes

Subtitles

yes

Connecting external devices

HDMI connector

4 pcs. (2 x 2.0, 2 x 2.1)

HDMI CEC

yes

USB connector

2 pcs.

Component input (Y/Pb/Pr)

no

Composite input (AV)

yes (S-CenterSpeaker hybrid input (1 side mini jack))

Ethernet (LAN)

yes

Audio output (3.5 mm headphone jack)

yes

Digital audio output (optical)

yes

Antenna input (RF)

yes

Built-in Wi-Fi module

yes

Bluetooth

yes

HDMI – ARC /

backward audio compatibility support

yes

Digital media playback

Playback HEVC

yes

MP3 playback

yes

MPEG4 playback

yes

DivX playback

yes

Playback MKV

yes

JPEG playback

yes

WMA playback

yes

Energy efficiency

Power supply

220 – 240 W, 50 Hz

Standby power consumption

0. 50 W

Energy saving function

yes

Dimensions and weight with stand

Width

106.9 cm

Height

62.6 cm

Depth

22.5 cm

Dimensions and weight without stand

Width

106.9 cm

Height

62.4 cm

Depth

5.8 cm

Weight

10.7 kg

Package

Table stand

yes

Wall Mount

no, optional

Remote control

yes

Batteries (for remote control)

yes

Power cable

yes

Documentation

yes

Additional information

Warranty

12 months

Color

black

Light effects (decor)

no

A90K review summary

Finally, I would like to make a brief summary of the A90K TV from Sony.