Coaxial cable with connector: Coaxial Cable Connector Types – Consolidated Electronic Wire & Cable

Coaxial Connectors – Ace Hardware

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Tips for Coaxial Cable Wiring

In today’s information age, a massive amount of information is being pushed through our coaxial cables, leaving very little room for error. Here are 23 tips to improve TV reception and internet speed with your coaxial cable connectors.

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Family Handyman

Use the Proper Coaxial Cable

It’s important to install the proper cable. RG-6 (‘RG’ is an old military term for Radio Guide/Grade) is the industry standard, but there are other considerations. Use this chart to help determine which cable is best for the job.

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Family Handyman

Roll Out Coaxial Cable

If you lay a spool of cable on its side and start pulling cable off it, the cable will twist as it unravels, and a twisted cable kinks when you pull on it. It’s best to slide a section of conduit through the center of the spool and rest it on a ladder. Secure the conduit with a scrap piece of wire.

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Family Handyman

Avoid Sharp Bends with Coaxial Cable

Sharp bends will damage a cable. Think of wrapping a cable around a coffee can; coaxial cable should never be bent sharper than that. Use a 90-degree adapter when a sharp bend is unavoidable, like behind a TV stand. Just make sure the connector is rated to handle Hi-Def if that’s the signal you’re working with.

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Family Handyman

Avoid Coaxial Cable Stingers

Once coaxial cable has been stripped, leave the foil in place, but peel back the braid. Make certain that not even one of the tiny wires of the braid touches the center conductor. That’s what the pros call a “stinger,” and stingers are notorious for wreaking havoc with signal quality.

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Family Handyman

Use a Coaxial Cable Stripping Tool

It’s not impossible to strip a coaxial cable with a utility knife, but it’s not easy. A $15 stripping tool gives you fast and perfect results every time. Coaxial cable strippers have two blades: One blade cuts through the jacket without damaging the braid, and the other blade cuts through everything except the center conductor. Some pros prefer to leave the center conductor a bit long and trim it down (about 1/8 in. past the connector) after the connector is crimped on.

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Family Handyman

Use Coaxial Cable Compression Connectors

Avoid push-on, screw-on and crimp-on coaxial cable connectors; compression connectors work best. You’ll need a $15 crimping tool to install compression connectors.

Buy coaxial cable connectors that can handle the highest frequency available. Some cheap coaxial cable connectors may work for a security camera, but not a Hi-Def TV or Internet signal. The same goes for wall plates. Not all wall plates have built-in coaxial cable connectors capable of handling high-end signals. When in doubt, buy the connector with the highest frequency rating. The rating should be displayed on the packaging.

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Family Handyman

Bond Coaxial Cable

Even if your Hi-Def TV is working fine, you might want to check to see that the coaxial cable is “bonded” to the house’s grounding system. Bonding simply means connecting two things to ensure electrical continuity and conductivity. In a home, it’s important that the electrical system, communication systems, metal plumbing pipes, metal gas piping and other metallic systems be electrically bonded together.

Electrically bonding various systems together limits the different voltage potential (pressure) and shock hazards that could be present during a lightning strike or other electrical anomaly. A difference in voltage potential can create strong currents that can jump between two different systems through an undesirable path, and that path could be you!.

The simplest way to bond your coaxial cable to the rest of the house is to run the cables through a grounding block, and then run a wire from the block to the grounding electrode (ground rod) or other qualifying grounding connection point. If you have no idea where any part of the home’s grounding system is, call an electrician. In addition to electrocution, improperly grounded cables could lead to damaged electronics and house fires.

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Family Handyman

Make a Drip Loop in Coaxial Cable

Exterior coaxial cable should never run sideways or downward and directly into your house. Rainwater will adhere to the cable and follow it right into your home. Loop the cable before it enters the building. The loop will not only help shed the water but also provide extra cable for future work or repairs.

A feed-through bushing will allow you to drill a slightly larger hole so you can fish the cable through the wall without damaging it. Dab silicone caulk behind the bushing before pushing it into its final resting place. Secure cables with clamps or straps that are held in place with screws. Avoid cable straps or hangers that require nails or staples. The chances are good that you’ll eventually miss the nail on the strap and whack the cable with your hammer by accident. A cable that’s been crushed by a hammer is a cable that will corrupt a signal. Straps with the screws already in place are favored by pros.

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Family Handyman

Install a Low-Voltage Box for Coaxial Cable

It’s much easier to fish a coaxial cable through a low-voltage box (sometimes called a “mud ring”) than through a regular electrical box. But that’s not the only reason to use them. Low-voltage boxes allow you to push the extra length of wires into the wall cavity without over bending them. You’ll damage the cable if you try to cram it into a small electrical box. Leave 8 to 10 in. of extra cable in the wall cavity just in case you want to make changes down the road.

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Family Handyman

Make Good Coaxial Cable Connections

You won’t get a good connection if the dielectric portion of the coaxial able isn’t pushed flush with the connector. If it’s really difficult to do, you may have the wrong connector for the cable you’re working with. RG-59, RG-6 and RG-6 Quad all require different connectors.

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Family Handyman

Run Coaxial Cables Perpendicular to Electrical Cables

Keep coaxial cables away from electrical cables. Electrical cables that run parallel with a coaxial cable can interfere with your signal. It’s OK, however, to run coaxial cables perpendicular to electrical cables.

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Family Handyman

Buy Quad-Shield Coaxial Cable

Shielding is what counts when it comes to coaxial cable quality. It blocks interference and keeps the signal clean. Skip the economy cable and go right for the “quad-shield” product. Quad-shield costs twice as much as cable labeled “dual” or “double-shield.” But after spending big bucks on your TV or computer, skimping on coax just doesn’t make sense.

High-quality cable has two layers of metal foil and two layers of braided wire to block interference.

Economy cable has just one layer of metal foil and braided wire.

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Family Handyman

Cut Coaxial Cable Carefully

The signal carried by the coaxial cable center wire actually travels along the outside of the wire, not through the inside. So a tiny nick in the wire can cause a big obstacle for the signal. That’s why a special coaxial cable stripper (sold at home centers) is the only tool you should use to prepare the ends of the cable for connectors. Never use standard wire strippers or a knife. A coax cable stripper cleanly cuts the outer jacket, the shielding and the foam jacket in one step—without harming the center wire.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Kink the Cable

The wire at the center of coaxial cable is molded inside a foam jacket to keep it away from the shielding and to block interference. If you kink the cable or bend it around a sharp corner, you crush the foam. At that point, the damage is done and there’s no way to undo it. Never bend cable around a radius smaller than 3 in.

When coax cable kinks, the center wire crushes its foam jacket and gets too close to the shielding. That leads to interference.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Pull Too Hard

Coaxial cable is fragile, and kinking and crushing aren’t the only ways to damage the foam jacket surrounding the center wire. Pulling coax cable too hard tightens the braided wire shielding and compresses the foam (the way ‘Chinese handcuffs’ tighten around your finger). That harms signal quality. The maximum pulling force for RG-6 cable is 35 lbs. Make several short pulls through walls and ceilings instead of a long tug-of-war pull.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Run Coax Too Close to Electrical Wiring

Electrical lines can cause nasty interference in coaxial cable. So keep coax cables as least 6 in. away from electrical cable, even if the cables are separated by wood or other building materials. To reduce any chance of trouble from phone lines, install ‘twisted pair’ or shielded phone wiring. If the coax must cross over an electrical line, create a 90-degree intersection.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Crush the Cable

There are a few kinds of staples made for coax, and all of them work well—as long as you don’t drive them in too far. Forced too tightly over the cable, they’ll crush the foam jacket inside, causing the same trouble as a kink. If you’re running lots of coax, buy a special cable stapler, which won’t crush the cable. They’re available at some home centers or online (search for ‘cable stapler’). When using a hammer, don’t pound too hard. The staple shouldn’t bite into the cable; a loose hold is better than a tight hold.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Let the Shields Show

The best cable-routing job can get fouled up if you aren’t careful when you attach the end connector. Always fold back the foil and braided shield carefully before you attach the connector. A single strand of braid protruding into the connector area can ruin the signal. Double-check your work before you crimp or compress the connector.

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Family Handyman

Don’t Use Screw-On Connectors

Solid connections at the ends of coax cable provide a clear path for the signal to follow. Loose connections weaken the signal. End coaxial cable connectors that screw on over the outer jacket of cable can loosen up over time and even fall off. Instead, use crimp-ring style coaxial cable connectors and a special crimping tool (sold at home centers), or better yet, compression-style connectors. Compression-type connectors grip cable firmly, without crushing the inner foam jacket as crimp-style connectors sometimes do.

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Don’t Just Finger-Tighten Coaxial Cable Connectors

As with end coaxial cable connectors, the threaded  coaxial cable connectors on wall jacks, computers and TVs must provide a solid path for the signal. Most people finger-tighten these connections, but that just isn’t good enough. Instead, using a 7/16-in. wrench, turn the nut an extra quarter turn to snug up the connection.

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Install Cable Outlet: Don’t Use Standard Electrical Boxes

The sides and back on a standard electrical box force you to bend the cable sharply inside the box, which can degrade the signal. Low-voltage boxes let you make a gentle bend because they aren’t really boxes at all, just frames that mount on drywall. These boxes are sold at home centers and can also be used for phone, speaker and other low-voltage wiring.

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Don’t Use a Cheap Splitter

Every time you split a TV signal, it gets weaker. But you have to split the signal of your coaxial cable connectors if you want to add a TV. Still, you can avoid poor picture quality. First, buy a splitter that can handle the bandwidth needed for high-definition television and high-speed Internet. If you get poor picture quality after installing a coax cable splitter for TV and internet, call your cable provider for advice (they may increase your signal strength). You can also install an amplifier to boost the signal coming from your antenna, satellite or cable service. Amplifiers are sold at home centers, electronics stores and online (search for ‘TV amplifier’). But plan to spend $50 or more to get better results. And keep your receipt so you can return the amplifier if it doesn’t help.

Judge a splitter by the numbers. If you have cable service, buy one labeled ‘5-1450 MHz.’ For satellite TV, look for a high end of at least 2200 MHz.

Originally Published: June 27, 2019

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  • Article: 05-3078

    Description Lightning protection for coaxial cable BNC connector REXANT

    Protects equipment from high voltage surges during lightning strikes. Wide range of applications: CCTV, TV antennas, satellite receivers, radios, camcorders, monitors, multiplexers, DVRs, etc.
    Maximum surge voltage Volt 12V
    Max. current 5kA
    Coaxial cable insulation resistance Ohm 75Ω
    Jump resistance during operation Ohm 20v
    Bandwidth Hertz 10Mbps
    Insertion Loss
    Return loss /
    Connector type BNC
    Weight Kg 0.200

    See this item

    Reviews Lightning protection coaxial cable BNC connector REXANT

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    Articles

    . .. a coaxial cable becomes a radio product after it is terminated with detachable connectors
    Technical expression

    Considering the Russian market of detachable connectors, in common parlance – connectors, you come to the conclusion that over the past 5 years their nomenclature has remained practically unchanged, and the number of manufacturers of these products, unlike manufacturers of coaxial cable, does not increase geometrically progressions.

    The review of the market for coaxial connectors may be somewhat subjective, since large-scale marketing research for this category of goods has not been carried out and statistics for all suppliers have not been generalized, but at least it reflects its realities.

    Which of the manufacturers of coaxial connectors, and in what capacity, is present on our market?

    Manufacturers of the Asian region

    If the cable manufacturers of this region are doing pretty well at the moment, due to the solution of problems with the number of factories and the quality of their products, then the manufacturers of coaxial connectors cannot boast of either.
    Despite the huge potential of our eastern neighbors, the number of factories offering the most complete lines of coaxial connectors is depressingly small. There are several reasons for this.

    • Not every manufacturer has the necessary equipment for the production of complex coaxial connectors.
    • It is possible to purchase the equipment mentioned above, but there are no specialists ready to professionally service this equipment.

    Proceeding from this, the situation is as follows.

    Most of the Russian market has threaded and crimped F-type coaxial connectors from Asian manufacturers for RG6 and RG11 coaxial cable. Threaded connectors have the simplest design, requiring minimal labor and inexpensive raw materials during production. But, despite the primitive design of F-type threaded connectors for RG6 / RG11 coaxial cable, pitfalls may lie in wait for cable television operators during their installation and operation.

    Poor fitting of the F-type coaxial connector nut onto its body causes “reliable” separation of them from each other during installation, and saving on the height of the internal thread causes chronic incontinence of the coaxial cable in the connector body. The advantage of these connectors is the versatility of the approach to determining their quality.

    Customer requirements are diametrically opposed. Some require that the connector be tightly mounted on the coaxial cable and clearly fixed on it. For others, this is a disadvantage and the main thing is that the connector is easily screwed onto the coaxial cable. Attempts to purchase threaded connectors of higher quality generally result in them being packaged in any place that is prestigious for the client, but of Asian origin.

    Crimp coaxial connectors for RG6/RG11 cable, due to their more complex design, require higher qualifications from the manufacturer and, as a rule, are made of better quality. The main problem is that if the material used to produce the crimp connector is of poor quality, then during crimping, the body of the coaxial connector is partially or completely destroyed. More complex in design coaxial connectors are copied from well-known manufacturers. But the more complex the design of the copied product, the greater the likelihood of technological errors.

    In the fight against the world’s high technologies for the production of structurally complex coaxial connectors, an inexpensive, but well-established method is used. The appearance of the copied connector is preserved to the smallest detail, and its internal stuffing is decisively simplified to a level that is most convenient for the manufacturer of this product. Because of this, cable TV network operators are quite cautious about the use of collet coaxial connectors for RG11 coaxial cable and coaxial trunk cable made by Asian manufacturers.

    Leading global manufacturers

    PPC

    PPC is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of coaxial connectors and accessories for cable television networks. The line of coaxial connectors PPC is presented for the main types of coaxial cable present on the Russian market. F-type screw connectors for coaxial cable are not manufactured by PPC .

    F-type crimp connectors are available in both non-hermetic and hermetic versions. In the non-sealed version, the connectors are made with a reinforced crimped cable part, which allows you to securely fix the coaxial cable in the connector housing. The tightness of the connector is ensured by standard solutions. At the junction of the F-type coaxial connector with the mating part, an ring seal is installed under the union nut, and the junction with the coaxial cable is sealed with silicone filler in the cable part of the connector. It should be noted that the use of silicone filler is the most budgetary solution and does not always lead to obtaining the necessary and guaranteed result.

    PPC has a wide range of F-type compression connectors for RG59, RG6 and RG11 coaxial cable. For coaxial cable RG59 and RG6, an economical class of compression connectors of the CMP series with a compression plastic insert is offered. The color of the insert determines the type of coaxial cable for which the connector is intended.

    The more expensive EX® SERIES is designed for RG59, RG6, RG7 and RG11 coaxial cable and has a more complex design. connectors are positioned for internal and external mounting, but the viability of unprotected plastic parts with a large temperature difference and when exposed to the external environment raises certain doubts.

    A series of collet connectors with various connecting sizes (F-type, PG11, 5/8”, etc.) made of brass, nickel-plated and designed for various types of coaxial cable. and P3 CommScope and TX Times Fiber series are made of aluminium, galvanized and have two and three main parts construction.

    GILBERT Company

    This company is familiar to most cable TV operators, primarily for aluminum coaxial connectors on the main cable QR and P3 CommScope and TX Times Fiber series, as well as plugless connectors on RG11 and QR.

    During its work on our market, GILBERT has carried out three upgrades of these coaxial connectors, achieving improved electrical and mechanical characteristics, reducing installation time and simplifying installation technology, minimizing subjective factors affecting installation quality. The PD series was replaced by the GT series, which in turn was replaced by the 9 series0080 G2 .

    Series G2 and GRS were developed jointly with the manufacturer of the trunk cable QR , CommScope and are an aluminum coaxial connector, consists of two ( G2 ), and three ( GRS 90 081) main parts.

    G2 Connector Main Body includes a connecting interface (5/8; F-type male, male, F-type female, female, female) and a coaxial cable center conductor mount. The cable housing of the G2 connector includes a mount for the outer conductor and a coaxial cable sheath, a control mechanism for the mount of the central conductor of the main part.

    connectors for cable series GRS have a cable housing consisting of two parts, where the second part implements a slightly different technology for attaching a coaxial cable to the sheath. The plugless connector G-11-FT-SPL , popular with cable operators, for RG11 coaxial cable is not essentially a push-in connector. There is a cone on the main body of the connector, to which the braid and sheath of the coaxial cable are hermetically pressed by the cable body of the connector.

    Now our market offers coaxial connectors similar in appearance to connector G-11-FT-SPL , but very different in the way the coaxial cable is attached to the connector housing. Fastening is carried out by pressing the braid and sheath of the coaxial cable to the cone with a rubber ring located in the cable housing of the connector. When the rubber ring breaks, or if it loses its elasticity, the coaxial cable is successfully released from the connector installed on it.

    The GILBERT plating of aluminum connectors has been improved to meet the very stringent environmental requirements of European countries while maintaining a high degree of environmental protection.

    CABELCON

    Cabelcon represents a complete line of connectors for almost all types of coaxial cable used in the construction of cable television networks in Russia, including the most exotic ones.

    F-type crimp connectors for RG59, RG6 and RG11 coaxial cable in standard (ALM) and sealed (EPA) designs, have a durable NITIN-6™ outer coating that allows them to be used for both indoor and outdoor installations.

    Coaxial connectors F-56-ALM 4.9/8.4 and FM-RG11-ALM 7.6/11.7 work in almost all cable and satellite TV networks due to their quality and reliability , have become a kind of “Russian standard”, in relation to which all other coaxial connectors appearing on our market are compared.

    coaxial connectors with patented CX4 coaxial cable attachment design for ease of installation and high mechanical and electrical performance in a wide range of connection sizes.

    Compression connectors of this company have been used in the construction of Russian cable television networks since 2001.

    At present, RG59 and RG6 coaxial cable are equipped with F-type, BNC, RCA and TV compression connectors, RG11 coaxial cable with F-type and 5/8” compression connectors. All compression connectors are sealed. After pressing the compression connectors Cabelcon have an all-metal construction that reliably protects the junction from environmental influences.

    There is no bad equipment, there are bad engineers…
    Folklore.

    Each connector on our market serves a specific purpose. And if an inexpensive threaded connector works well on a single subscriber line, this does not mean that, like a professional crimp or compression connector, it will work for a long time and reliably on any important section of the cable television network.

    Each section of the cable television network has its own quality and reliability requirements for plug-in connectors.

    The desire to save money on something is indestructible with us. But the operator of the cable television network is Homo sapiens , and for the most part also a technical person, in order to manage these desires and not bring them to please the well-being of their network.

    This conclusion allows us to draw the realities of the construction, operation and development of these networks.

    connectors

    1 Cable cutter type RG59/6/7/11
    Main cable cutter
    98028621
    98028623

    Cutting cables up to 10mm
    Cutting trunk cables up to 25mm (1″)

    2 Rotary cable stripper RG6/59 98501010 For cutting cables type RG6/59
    2 Rotary cable stripper RG11 98501102 For stripping cables type RG7/11
    3 Rotary stripper 98501105 For type -32 connectors, for RG11 cable termination
    4 Compression tool CX3 all sizes 98029072 CX3 – F, IEC and BNC connectors for cables type RG59/6/7 and RG11
    5 CAT-AS-IEC/RCA-FX tool 98029049 CX3 IEC, RCA, E and F connectors for RG59/6/7 and RG11 type cables
    5 G-CAT Multimedia Tool 98029064 For Gilbert UltraEase
    6 CX3 pocket tool for RG59/6 cable 98029070 For CX3 connectors F and IEC, cable type RG59/6
    6 CX3 pocket tool for RG59/6 cable 98029074 For CX3 BNC connectors, cable type RG59/6
    7 Mounting tool for F connectors by type All types of F connectors
    8 Rubber cable accessory 98028785 For cables type RG59/6/7 and RG11 (diameter 3 to 12mm)
    9 Tightening tool for connectors Ø 20mm 98028794 For cables type RG6/59 F crimp and compression
    10 Crimping tool CRP106 by type All types of crimp connectors Corning Cabelcon
    11 Torque wrench AH (straight head) 98029090 For tightening F connectors 11mm straight socket, torque 4. 5 Nm
    11 Torque wrench AH 98029080 For tightening F connectors 11mm angle head, torque 4.5 Nm
    11 Torque wrench AH 4.5 Nm Hex 9/16″ 98029095 For tightening F connectors 14mm straight socket, torque 4.5 Nm
    12 Installation tool HT-2206F 98028798 For cables type MINI, RG59/6 F crimp and compression
    12 Installation Tool HT-2206 98028796 For BNC connectors

    In addition to the tools known and widely used in the construction of cable TV networks for cutting coaxial cable and mounting connectors on it, there are a number of tools and devices that, on the one hand, significantly speed up and facilitate these processes, on the other hand, improve the quality of installation.

    Tools and fixtures for F-type connectors.

    These tools and fixtures facilitate the installation of connectors on both tightly braided coaxial cable and tight sheath coaxial cable, and connectors with an extended cable part, and on coaxial cable with an outer sheath diameter of 8 mm and above, where it is necessary to install connectors make serious efforts.
    Claims by cable users that polyethylene-sheathed coaxial RF cable is difficult to lay, that it is impossible to install connectors on it, are based on a lack of information about these tools and fixtures used in the installation work with this cable.

    Tool for mounting F-type connectors.

    To facilitate the installation of threaded, crimp and compression connectors, use the F-type connector assembly tool. It is made in the form of a plastic handle with a mating F(female) connector.
    The end of the plug-in installs the dielectric of the coaxial cable exactly along the cut of the connector housing. At the end of the detachable part there is a hole into which the central conductor of the coaxial cable enters. A small through hole in the threaded part is used for visual inspection of the center conductor.

    The technology of working with this tool is simple. In the right hand we take a plastic handle with a connector tightly wound onto it, in the left hand a coaxial cable. We begin to vigorously wind the threaded connector, or apply force to the handle with the crimp or compression connector screwed on it in the longitudinal direction, and … safely break the coaxial cable in the place where we held it with the thumb and forefinger of the left hand.

    The reason for this failure is quite simple. We increased the force applied to the connector with a convenient plastic handle several times, and it became much more difficult to keep the coaxial cable from breaking with two fingers at the installation site.
    In addition, as experience shows, coaxial cable is extremely negative about such an “experiment”. Even after the cable has been restored to its original appearance, fractured dielectric and shielding can cause RF signal reflections and, in extreme cases, short circuits between the center and outer conductors. There is a device to prevent such cases.

    Cable clamp.

    For reliable fixation of the coaxial cable in the place of installation, a device made of molded rubber, made in the form of a disk with cross-shaped slots, is used. The slots are marked with numbers: 3-6 and 6-12. These numbers indicate the outer diameter of the coaxial cable in millimeters, which is clamped by these slots. A through hole in the disc is used to attach any convenient latch, which allows the installer not to accidentally part with his favorite device.

    So, the second attempt. A plastic handle for mounting, with a screwed connector, in the right hand, a coaxial cable, which is securely clamped with a latch, in the left hand. This time, the connector was mounted successfully and the tip of the central conductor, which we observed in the hole of the threaded part, says that the connector was mounted correctly. While holding the connector nut, unscrew the handle from the F-type connector. The threaded connector is ready for use immediately, and the crimp or compression connector remains to be fixed to the cable with a special tool.

    Mounting tool for installing the F-type connector.

    When it is difficult to reach the installation site of the connector, or the strong hand of the installer is more than the available free space at the installation site, use a tool that allows you to extend the installer’s arm by 16 centimeters and install the F-type connector mounted on the coaxial cable RG59 and RG6 in the most inaccessible places.

    The tool is made in the form of a plastic handle, on one side of which there is a mating part of the F-type connector with a hole for the central conductor of the coaxial cable, but without an inspection hole in the threaded part, on the other hand, a metal rod with a universal split grip for the F- connector nut type.

    Split grip for threaded, crimp and compression connectors from various manufacturers, securely holds hex nuts and nuts with six lugs.

    During installation, even without significant effort, due to the torsion effect of the tool that occurs in the rod, the connector is securely fixed on the counterpart. Attempts to turn it off by hand usually end in failure. Removing the connector with this tool requires almost no effort.

    Tools and fixtures for BNC connectors.

    To facilitate the installation of BNC (male) connectors, a number of devices are used. As we noted earlier, the coaxial cable clamp handles the coaxial cable. As for the installation and installation of BNC connectors, there are the following devices.

    BNC connector mounting tool.

    This tool is similar to the F-type connector tool, but has a plastic handle, but instead of the F-type connector, it has a BNC mating connector.
    The hole for inspection of the center conductor on this tool is made differently than on the tool for the F-type connector. This is due to the design of the BNC male connector.
    Often there are BNC connectors in which the center pin is recessed into the connector insulator. When mounting the connector on a coaxial cable, the central conductor of the cable enters the split collet of the pin, abuts against its base and lifts the pin out of the insulator. The occupation of the pin in the normal position in the connector indicates the correctness of the installation. Accordingly, the pin, which remains recessed into the insulator, signals the incorrect installation of the connector. In order to save on installation time and not to constantly remove the tool from the connector, controlling the position of the central pin, a signal mechanism is installed on the mating part of the BNC connector.

    It is a spring-loaded platform with a stem with a mark on the stem.
    With the pin in its original position, this mark is not visible in the test hole. The same picture will be observed after mounting the connector on the coaxial cable, if the central conductor of the cable does not reach the pin, or for some other reason the pin does not take its normal position.